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Trade openness, capital openness and government size

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  • Liberati, Paolo

Abstract

This paper provides empirical evidence of the relation between trade openness, capital openness and government expenditures in a cross sectional time-series context. It is shown that capital openness is significantly and negatively related to government expenditures in line with the conventional wisdom that capital mobility may undermine the ability of governments to maintain larger public sectors. More importantly, the compensation hypothesis originally proposed by Rodrik (1998) and traceable back to Cameron (1978) is not in general supported by the data.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/44371/
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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/44569/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 44371.

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Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Public Policy 27.2(2007): pp. 215-247
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44371

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Keywords: Government Size; Openness; Compensation hypothesis;

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References

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  1. Benjamin I. Page, . "Trouble for Workers and the Poor: Economic Globalization and the Reshaping of American Politics," IPR working papers 97-6, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
  2. Joshua Aizenman & Yothin Jinjarak, 2006. "Globalization and Developing Countries - A Shrinking Tax Base?," NBER Working Papers 11933, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Axel Dreher, 2003. "The Influence of globalization on taxes and social policy - an empirical enalysis for OECD countries," Discussion Papers 0301, Exeter University, Department of Economics.
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  5. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  6. Slemrod, Joel, 2004. "Are corporate tax rates, or countries, converging?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 1169-1186, June.
  7. Rodrik, Dani, 1996. "Why do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1388, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Duane Swank, 1998. "Funding the Welfare State: Globalization and the Taxation of Business in Advanced Market Economies," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 46(4), pages 671-692, 09.
  9. Benjamin I. Page, 1997. "Trouble for Workers and the Poor: Economic Globalization and the Reshaping of American Politics," JCPR Working Papers 5, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  10. Wacziarg, Romain & Alesina, Alberto, 1998. "Openness, Country Size and Government," Scholarly Articles 4553014, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  11. Ajit Singh, 2003. "Capital Account Liberalization, Free Long-Term Capital Flows, Financial Crises and Economic Development," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 191-216, Spring.
  12. Bretschger, Lucas & Hettich, Frank, 2000. "Globalisation, capital mobility and tax competition: Theory and evidence for OECD countries," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Diskussionspapiere 07/2000, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Faculty of Law and Economics.
  13. Garen, John & Trask, Kathleen, 2005. "Do more open economies have bigger governments? Another look," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 533-551, August.
  14. Muhammad Islam, 2004. "The long run relationship between openness and government size: evidence from bounds test," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 995-1000.
  15. Hassan Molana & Catia Montagna & Mara Violato, 2004. "On the Causal Relationship between Trade Openness and Government Size: Evidence from 23 OECD Countries," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 164, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  16. Ruggie, John Gerard, 1982. "International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(02), pages 379-415, March.
  17. Akai, Nobuo & Sakata, Masayo, 2002. "Fiscal decentralization contributes to economic growth: evidence from state-level cross-section data for the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 93-108, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Erauskin, Iñaki, 2013. "The impact of financial openness on the size of utility-enhancing government," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy, vol. 7(38), pages 1-56.
  2. Francesca Gastaldi & Paolo Liberati, 2011. "Economic integration and government size: a review of the empirical literature," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 35(3), pages 327-384.
  3. Erauskin-Iurrita, Inaki, 2008. "Financial openness and the size of the public sector: a portfolio approach," MPRA Paper 10619, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Sep 2008.
  4. Paolo Liberati & Antonio Sciala, 2011. "How economic integration affects the vertical structure of the public sector," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 385-402, December.
  5. Gregor Schwerhoff & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2013. "Is Capital Mobility Good for Public Good Provision?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4420, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Michael Devereux & Simon Loretz, 2012. "What do we know about corporate tax competition?," Working Papers 1229, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
  7. Muhammad Zakaria & Samreen Shakoor, 2011. "Relationship Between Government Size and Trade Openness: Evidence from Pakistan," Transition Studies Review, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 328-341, December.
  8. Antonio Sciala' & Paolo Liberati, 2008. "The impact of economic openness on the vertical structure of the public sector," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0085, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  9. Iñaki Erauskin, 2011. "Financial openness, volatility, and the size of productive government," SERIEs, Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 233-253, June.
  10. Gregor Schwerhoff & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2014. "The Globalization Paradox Revisited," CESifo Working Paper Series 4878, CESifo Group Munich.

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