Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Analysis of subjective wellbeing in low-income transitional countries: evidence from comparative national surveys in Armenia,Azerbaijan and Georgia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Nazim, Habibov
  • Elvin, Afandi

Abstract

Drawing on the comparative household surveys, this article examines subjective wellbeing in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, three low-income transitional countries located on the Caucasus. We found that economic factors explain a considerable part of the variation in subjective wellbeing. The results are significant and robust across all countries. Having a higher level of household income, university education and a larger number of people in household along with salary as a major income source positively affect subjective wellbeing. On the contrary, being unemployed or a migrant along with having social transfers as a major source of income negatively affect subjective wellbeing. Besides, subjective wellbeing is strongly associated with disagreement with the current direction of countries’development and withdrawal from discussing policy. We argue that analysis of subjective wellbeing can be used to enrich and validate the process of poverty analysis in the countries of the region.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/42720/
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 42720.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Comparative Social Welfare 3.25(2009): pp. 203-219
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42720

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: poverty; inequality; living standards; welfare; social policy; Armenia; Azerbaijan; Georgia;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2002. "Rich and powerful? Subjective power and welfare in Russia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2854, The World Bank.
  2. Francisco H. G. Ferreira, 1999. "Economic transition and the distributions of income and wealth," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 377-410, July.
  3. Roger Newson, 2002. "Parameters behind "nonparametric" statistics: Kendall's tau,Somers' D and median differences," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(1), pages 45-64, February.
  4. Jeffrey Bookwalter & Brandon Fuller & Douglas Dalenberg, 2006. "Do Household Heads Speak for the Household? A Research Note," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 79(3), pages 405-419, December.
  5. Michael M. Lokshin & Ruslan Yemtsov, 2004. "Household Strategies of Coping with Shocks in Post-crisis Russia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(1), pages 15-32, 02.
  6. Steven B. Holtzman & Taies Nezam, 2004. "Living in Limbo : Conflict-Induced Displacement in Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14943, October.
  7. Asad Alam & Mamta Murthi & Ruslan Yemtsov & Edmundo Murrugarra & Nora Dudwick & Ellen Hamilton & Erwin Tiongson, 2005. "Growth, Poverty and Inequality : Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7287, October.
  8. Michael Lokshin & Ruslan Yemtsov, 2004. "Combining Longitudinal Household and Community Surveys for Evaluation of Social Transfers: infrastructure rehabilitation projects in rural Georgia," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 265-277.
  9. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2002. "Self-rated economic welfare in Russia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1453-1473, September.
  10. Pamela Abbott & Roger Sapsford, 2006. "Life-Satisfaction in Post-Soviet Russia and Ukraine," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 251-287, 06.
  11. Winkelmann, Liliana & Winkelmann, Rainer, 1998. "Why Are the Unemployed So Unhappy? Evidence from Panel Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 1-15, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Nazim N. Habibov, 2011. "Self-perceived social stratification in low-income transitional countries: Examining the multi-country survey in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 5-22, December.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42720. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.