Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The silence of the archive: post-colonialism and the practice of historical reconstruction from archival evidence

Contents:

Author Info

  • Decker, Stephanie

Abstract

History as a discipline has been accused of being a-theoretical. For business historians working at business schools, however, the issue of methodology looms larger, as it is hard to make contributions to social science debates without explicating one’s disciplinary methodology. This paper seeks to outline an important aspect of historical methodology, which is data collection from archives. In this area, postcolonialism has made significant methodological contributions not just for non-Western history, as it has emphasized the importance of considering how archives were created, and how one can legitimately use them despite their limitations.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/37280/
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 37280.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 22 Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37280

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Business History; Historiography; Historical Methodology; Qualitative Methodology; Organization Studies;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Christopher Kobrak & Andrea Schneider, 2011. "Varieties of business history: Subject and methods for the twenty-first century," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(3), pages 401-424.
  2. Stephanie Decker, 2011. "Corporate political activity in less developed countries: The Volta River Project in Ghana, 1958--66," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(7), pages 993-1017, December.
  3. John Wilson & Steven Toms, 2008. "Fifty years of Business History," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 125-126.
  4. Stephanie Decker, 2010. "Postcolonial Transitions in Africa: Decolonization in West Africa and Present Day South Africa," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 791-813, 07.
  5. Geoffrey Jones & Tarun Khanna, 2006. "Bringing history (back) into international business," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 37(4), pages 453-468, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Linking History and Management Discourse: Epistemology and Method
    by bbatiz in NEP-HIS blog on 2012-04-19 13:36:38
  2. Linking History and Management Discourse: Epistemology and Method
    by bbatiz in NEP-HIS blog on 2012-04-19 13:36:38
  3. Linking History and Management Discourse: Epistemology and Method
    by bbatiz in NEP-HIS blog on 2012-04-19 13:36:38

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37280. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.