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Barter relationships

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  • Prendergast, Canice
  • Stole, Lars

Abstract

We offer a simple economic model of repeated barter to explore current economic exchange in Russia: individuals trade with each other in a dynamic environment where the threat of dissolving the relationship constrains the incentives to cheat. We show how the value of future interactions affects the willingness of individuals to trade with each other; only when rates of interaction are large can trust compensate for an absence of money. Moreover, when trading relationships are asymmetric – either in the trading partners’ values for each other’s goods or in their relative bargaining power – the resulting barter allocations are distorted, as goods must be used for liquidity reasons. When third-party middlemen exist who can facilitate barter, they command a premium for their services, and have preferences for improved liquidity which may or may not correspond with the other traders in the barter economy. Fourth, we demonstrate that the restriction of trading to tight trading networks may be a socially efficient response to insufficient barter interactions. Finally, we consider how liquidity constraints affect pricing, and illustrate how the existence of a barter market can mute incentives to change prices in response to credit crunches.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 33400.

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Date of creation: Jan 2000
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33400

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Related research

Keywords: Barter; non-monetary exchange;

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References

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  1. Prendergast, Canice & Stole, Lars, 1999. "Restricting the means of exchange within organizations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 1007-1019, April.
  2. Canice Prendergast & Lars Stole, 2001. "Barter, Liquidity and Market Segmentation," CESifo Working Paper Series 586, CESifo Group Munich.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Wendy Carlin & Steven Fries & Mark Schaffer & Paul Seabright, 2000. "Barter and non-monetary transactions in transition economies: Evidence from a cross-country survey," Working Papers 50, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  2. Isabel Pla Julián, 2003. "Cambios institucionales en la economía rusa: de las reformas de mercado a la consolidación monetaria," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 5(8), pages 66-91, January-J.
  3. Canice Prendergast & Lars Stole, 2001. "Barter, Liquidity and Market Segmentation," CESifo Working Paper Series 586, CESifo Group Munich.

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