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On the Trade Balance Response to Monetary Shocks: the Marshall-Lerner Conditions Reconsidered

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  • Lombardo, Giovanni

Abstract

This paper studies the applicability of the Marshall-Lerner condition to the "basic" Obstfeld and Rogoff (1995) model. It shows that the Marshall-Lerner condition does apply to this class of models with homothetic preferences when product differentiation across countries is imposed. This paper also shows that, in certain cases, the intertemporal substitution and the dynamic income effect can make the mere elasticity of substitution an insufficient indicator of the response of the current account to monetary shocks.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 27869.

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Date of creation: Dec 2001
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Publication status: Published in Journal of Economic Integration 16.4(2001): pp. 590-616
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27869

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Keywords: Trade Balance; Marshall-Lerner Conditions; Elasticity of Substitution; Monetary Shocks; Transfer Problem;

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References

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  1. David K. Backus & Patrick J. Kehoe & Finn E. Kydland, 1992. "Relative price movements in dynamic general equilibrium models of international trade," Working Paper 9213, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  2. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth S., 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Scholarly Articles 12491026, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 1996. "The exchange rate in a model of pricing-to-market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 1007-1021, April.
  4. Kollman, R., 1996. "The Exchange Rate in a Dynamic-Optimizing Current Account Model with Nominal Rigidities: a Quantitative Investigation," Cahiers de recherche 9614, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  5. Danthine, J.P. & Donaldson, J.B., 1991. "Methodological and Empirical Issues in Real Business Cycle Theory," Papers fb-_91-11, Columbia - Graduate School of Business.
  6. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti, 2001. "Welfare And Macroeconomic Interdependence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 421-445, May.
  7. Obstfeld, Maurice & Stockman, Alan C., 1985. "Exchange-rate dynamics," Handbook of International Economics, in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 917-977 Elsevier.
  8. Mendoza, Enrique G, 1995. "The Terms of Trade, the Real Exchange Rate, and Economic Fluctuations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(1), pages 101-37, February.
  9. Robert Miguel W. K. Kollman, 1997. "The Exchange Rate in a Dynamic-Optimizing Current Account Model with Nominal Rigidities," IMF Working Papers 97/7, International Monetary Fund.
  10. David K. Backus & Patrick J. Kehoe & Finn E. Kydland, 1992. "Dynamics of the trade balance and the terms of trade: the S-curve," Working Paper 9211, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  11. Sutherland, Alan, 1996. " Financial Market Integration and Macroeconomic Volatility," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(4), pages 521-39, December.
  12. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 1997. "Monetary Shocks and Real Exchange Rates in Sticky Price Models of International Business Cycles," NBER Working Papers 5876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Devereux, M. B., 2000. "How does a devaluation affect the current account?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 833-851, December.

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