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Excess co-movement in asset prices: The case of South Africa

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  • Ocran, Mathew
  • Mlambo, Chipo

Abstract

The paper investigates excess co-movement in asset prices in South Africa between 1995 and 2005 using the definition of excess comovement as correlation between two asset prices beyond what could be explained by key economic fundamentals. The results of the study suggest that there is excess co-movement between returns on equities and bonds in South Africa. The findings suggest that there are considerable noise traders on the financial market in South Africa. The result of this behaviour would be the tendency for the equity and bond prices to move together more than would be predicted by their shared fundamentals. These results are consistent with the possibility that a fad or crowd psychology plays a role in the volatility on the market for the two asset classes.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24277/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24277.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Publication status: Published in Journal of Studies in Economics & Econometrics 1.33(2009): pp. 25-39
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24277

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Related research

Keywords: Excess co-movement; Asset prices; equity market; bond market; South Africa;

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  1. Gikas A. Hardouvelis & Rafael La Porta & Thierry A. Wizman, 1993. "What moves the discount on country equity funds?," Research Paper 9324, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Shiller, Robert J. & Beltratti, Andrea E., 1992. "Stock prices and bond yields : Can their comovements be explained in terms of present value models?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 25-46, October.
  3. Froot, Kenneth A. & Dabora, Emil M., 1999. "How are stock prices affected by the location of trade?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 189-216, August.
  4. Fama, Eugene F. & French, Kenneth R., 1993. "Common risk factors in the returns on stocks and bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 3-56, February.
  5. Barberis, Nicholas & Shleifer, Andrei & Wurgler, Jeffrey, 2005. "Comovement," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 283-317, February.
  6. Pindyck, Robert S. & Rotemberg, Julio., 1987. "The excess co-movement of commodity prices," Working papers 1969-87., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  7. Branch, Ben, 1974. "Common Stock Performance and Inflation: An International Comparison," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(1), pages 48-52, January.
  8. Joseph E Finnerty & Thomas Schneeweis, 1979. "The Comovement of International Asset Returns," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 10(3), pages 66-78, September.
  9. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1992. " The Cross-Section of Expected Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 427-65, June.
  10. Pindyck, Robert S & Rotemberg, Julio J, 1993. "The Comovement of Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(4), pages 1073-1104, November.
  11. Kallberg, Jarl & Pasquariello, Paolo, 2008. "Time-series and cross-sectional excess comovement in stock indexes," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 481-502, June.
  12. Albert S. Kyle, 2001. "Contagion as a Wealth Effect," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1401-1440, 08.
  13. Geert Bekaert & Robert J. Hodrick, 2000. "Expectations Hypotheses Tests," NBER Working Papers 7609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Engsted, Tom & Tanggaard, Carsten, 2001. "The Danish stock and bond markets: comovement, return predictability and variance decomposition," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 243-271, July.
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