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The Collapse of Global Trade: What a Tangled Web We Weave

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  • Spehar, Ann / AOS

Abstract

A unique feature of the financial crisis is the unprecedented collapse in global world trade. The objective of this paper is to explain some of that collapse as a move toward protectionism triggered not by nationalistic interests but by ‘competing’ objectives among trading partners from the Mundell-Fleming Trilemma. Even with the best of intentions, efforts toward internal re-balancing necessarily implies harming your trading partner unintentionally if they should be using conflicting policy objectives of the Trilemma. National interests are at odds between two such countries and their policy prescriptions counteract, and paralyze re balancing and coordination efforts between nations. Policymakers may be forced into protectionists’ stances in an effort to counteract the internal re-balancing efforts of their neighbors.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/23875/
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 23875.

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Date of creation: 08 Jul 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23875

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Keywords: International Trade; Financial Crisis; Global Trade Collapse;

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  1. Michael Artis, 1991. "One market, one money: An evaluation of the potential benefits and costs of forming an economic and monetary union," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 315-321, October.
  2. Jonathan David Ostry & Atish R. Ghosh & Karl Friedrich Habermeier & Marcos Chamon & Mahvash Saeed Qureshi & Dennis B. S. Reinhardt, 2010. "Capital Inflows," IMF Staff Position Notes 2010/04, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Eichengreen, Barry & Irwin, Douglas A., 2010. "The Slide to Protectionism in the Great Depression: Who Succumbed and Why?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(04), pages 871-897, December.
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