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Still At Work? An empirical test of competing theories of long hours culture

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  • Cowling, Marc

Abstract

There is increasing evidence of a widening in the cross-country dispersion in general working hours. More recently, however, there has been considerable attention given to the “long hours culture” phenomenon identified in certain segments of the labour market, in particular amongst professional and managerial staff, and potential causes and impacts of such a culture. In this study we use a large-scale European worker survey to test the validity of several competing hypotheses of why people work long hours. Our results show that there is a labour – quality of leisure trade-off for women, but not for men. Other key determinants of long working hours are industry sector, occupational status, gender and job security proxied by employment contracts.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 1614.

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Date of creation: 30 Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1614

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Keywords: long hours work; labour-leisure trade-offs; labour supply;

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  1. Edward C. Prescott, 2003. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Staff Report 321, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Rebitzer, James B & Taylor, Lowell J, 1995. "Do Labor Markets Provide Enough Short-Hour Jobs? An Analysis of Work Hours and Work Incentives," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(2), pages 257-73, April.
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  8. Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Ziegler, Alexandre, 2003. "Asymmetric information about workers' productivity as a cause for inefficient long working hours," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 727-747, December.
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  10. Wim Groot & Henriëtte Van Den Brink, 2002. "Age and Education Differences in Marriages and their Effects on Life Satisfaction," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 153-165, June.
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  14. Barmby, Tim & Sessions, John G & Treble, John G, 1994. " Absenteeism, Efficiency Wages and Shirking," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(4), pages 561-66.
  15. Randy Hodson, 2004. "Work Life and Social Fulfillment: Does Social Affiliation at Work Reflect a Carrot or a Stick?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(2), pages 221-239.
  16. Tenbrunsel, Ann E. & Brett, Jeanne M. & Maoz, Eyal & Stroh, Linda K. & Reilly, Anne H., 1995. "Dynamic and Static Work-Family Relationships," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 233-246, September.
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