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What does a G-3 target zone mean for emerging-market economies?

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  • Reinhart, Carmen
  • Reinhart, Vincent

Abstract

This paper examines the argument for a G-3 exchange rate target zone strictly from an emerging market perspective. A commitment to damping G-3 exchange rate fluctuations, however, requires a willingness on the part of G-3 authorities to use domestic monetary policy to that end. Under a system of target zones, then, relative prices for emerging market economies may become more stable, but debt-servicing costs may become less predictable. We use a simple trade model to show that the resulting consequences for welfare are ambiguous.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 14099.

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Date of creation: Oct 2000
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14099

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Keywords: exchange rates interest rates volatility trade debt servicing;

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References

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  1. Dominguez, Kathryn M & Frankel, Jeffrey A, 1993. "Does Foreign-Exchange Intervention Matter? The Portfolio Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1356-69, December.
  2. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear Of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408, May.
  3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent R. Reinhart, 2001. "What Hurts Most? G-3 Exchange Rate or Interest Rate Volatility," NBER Working Papers 8535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: an empirical treatment," International Finance Discussion Papers 534, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Richard H. Clarida, 1999. "G3 Exchange Rate Relationships: A Recap of the Record and a Review of Proposals for Change," NBER Working Papers 7434, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Reinhart, Carmen & Kaminsky, Graciela, 1999. "The twin crises: The causes of banking and balance of payments problems," MPRA Paper 14081, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen, 2002. "Sovereign Credit Ratings Before and After Financial Crises," MPRA Paper 7410, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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Cited by:
  1. Gerardo ESQUIVEL & Felipe LARRAIN B., 2002. "The Impact Of G-3 Exchange Rate Volatility On Developing Countries," G-24 Discussion Papers 16, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.

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