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The Stock of Money and Why You Should Care

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  • Kelly, Logan J

Abstract

In this paper, I will examine the problems created by incorrectly using a simple sum monetary aggregate to measure the monetary stock. Specifically, I will show that simple sum monetary aggregate confounds the current stock of money with the investment stock of money and that this confounding leads the simple sum monetary aggregate to report an artificially smooth monetary stock. This smoothing causes important information about the dynamic movements of the monetary stock to be lost. This may offer at least a partial explanation of why so many studies find that money has little economic relevance. To that end, we will conclude the paper by examining a reduced form backward looking IS equation to determine whether monetary aggregates contain information about real GDP gap. This paper differs from previous work in that it focuses on smoothing of the monetary stock data caused by the use of simple sum methodology, where the previous work focuses on the bias exhibited by simple sum monetary aggregates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11455.

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Date of creation: 07 Nov 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11455

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Related research

Keywords: Monetary Aggregation; Money Stock; Currency Equivalent Index;

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References

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  1. Eric M. Leeper & Jennifer E. Roush, 2003. "Putting "M" back in monetary policy," International Finance Discussion Papers 761, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Glenn D. Rudebusch & Lars E.O. Svensson, 1999. "Eurosystem monetary targeting: lessons from U.S. data," Working Paper Series 99-13, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  3. Edward Nelson, 2000. "Direct effects of base money on aggregate demand: theory and evidence," Bank of England working papers 122, Bank of England.
  4. Kelly, Logan J, 2008. "The Currency Equivalent Index and the Current Stock of Money," MPRA Paper 7176, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. William A. Barnett & Unja Chae & John W. Keating, 2006. "The discounted economic stock of money with VAR forecasting," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 51, Society for Computational Economics.
  6. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Comparison of Interwar and Postwar Business Cycles: Monetarism Reconsidered," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 250-57, May.
  7. William Barnett & Apostolos Serletis & W. Erwin Diewert, 2005. "The Theory of Monetary Aggregation (book front matter)," Macroeconomics 0511008, EconWPA.
  8. Hafer, R.W. & Haslag, Joseph H. & Jones, Garett, 2007. "On money and output: Is money redundant?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 945-954, April.
  9. William Barnett, 2005. "Monetary Aggregation," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 200510, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2005.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. John Keating & Logan Kelly & Andrew Lee Smith & Victor J. Valcarcel, 2014. "A Model of Monetary Policy Shocks for Financial Crises and Normal Conditions," Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1002, UWRF - Center for Economic Research, College of Business and Economics, University of Wisconsin - River Falls.
  2. Kelly, Logan & Barnett, William A. & Keating, John W., 2010. "Rethinking the Liquidity Puzzle: Application of a New Measure of the Economic Money Stock," MPRA Paper 22085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Makram El-Shagi & Sebastian Giesen & Logan J. Kelly, 2012. "Monetary Policy in a World Where Money (Also) Matters," IWH Discussion Papers 6, Halle Institute for Economic Research.

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