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Corruption of the Politicized University: Lessons from the Orange Revolution in Ukraine

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  • Osipian, Ararat

Abstract

This paper argues that corruption is used on a systematic basis as a mechanism of direct and indirect administrative control from the state level down to local authorities and administrations of public and private institutions. Informal approval of corrupt activities in exchange for loyalty and compliance with the regime is commonplace in many countries. This paper explains how corrupt regimes maximize their position in terms of loyalty and compliance by using the example of the 2004 presidential elections in Ukraine. It presents mechanisms by which political bureaucracies politicize universities in order to influence students and channel their electoral power during the Orange Revolution in Ukraine.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11312.

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Date of creation: 30 Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11312

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Keywords: corruption; elections; politicization; students; university; Ukraine;

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  1. Jan R. Magnus & Victor M. Polterovich & Dmitri L. Danilov & Alexei V. Savvateev, 2002. "Tolerance of Cheating: An Analysis Across Countries," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 125-135, June.
  2. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Sabirianova, Klara, 2006. "Public Sector Pay and Corruption: Measuring Bribery from Micro Data," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5585, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Banfield, Edward C, 1975. "Corruption as a Feature of Governmental Organization," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 587-605, December.
  4. Georgy Petrov & Paul Temple, 2004. "Corruption in Higher Education: Some Findings from the States of the Former Soviet Union," Higher Education Management and Policy, OECD Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 83-99.
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