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Credence Goods Markets with Conscientious and Selfish Experts

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  • Liu, Ting
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Abstract

I study credence goods markets when there are both selfish and conscientious experts. The selfish expert is a profit maximizer. The conscientious expert wants to maximize profit and repair the consumer's problem. There are two classes of equilibria: uniform-price equilibria and nonuniform-price equilibria. A consumer cannot infer the expert's type from his price list in a uniform-price equilibrium but can do that in a nonuniform-price equilibrium. When the fraction of the conscientious expert is small, the selfish expert will be honest about the severity of the consumer's problem. When the fraction of the conscientious expert is large, the selfish expert will cheat the consumer; overcharging the consumer whenever he offers to repair the problem. Finally, more conscientious experts may result in a larger social loss. When the fraction of the conscientious expert is close to one of the two extremes, 0 and 1, more conscientious experts will result in smaller social loss. When the fraction of the conscientious expert is in a middle range, more conscientious experts may result in a larger social loss.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 1107.

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Date of creation: 08 Dec 2006
Date of revision: 10 Sep 0007
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1107

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Keywords: credence goods markets; conscientious experts; selfish experts; social loss;

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  1. Winand Emons, 1995. "Credence Goods Monopolists," Diskussionsschriften dp9501, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
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  7. Ingela Alger & Regis Renault, 2003. "Screening Ethics when Honest Agents Keep their Word," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 562, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 09 Nov 2004.
  8. Winand Emons, 1997. "Credence Goods and Fraudelent Experts," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(1), pages 107-119, Spring.
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Cited by:
  1. Uwe Dulleck & Rudolf Kerschbamer, 2007. "Experts vs. Discounters: Consumer Free Riding and Experts Withholding Advice in Markets for Credence Goods," Working Papers 2007-21, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
  2. Dominik Erharter, 2012. "Credence goods markets, distributional preferences and the role of institutions," Working Papers 2012-11, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.

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