Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Power and temporal commitment preference: An investigation in Portugal, Turkey, and the United States

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sungu Armagan

    ()
    (College of Business Administration - Florida International University)

  • Manuel Portugal Ferreira

    ()
    (Instituto Politécnico de Leiria)

  • Gerardo A. Okhuysen

    ()
    (University of Utah)

  • Adam D. Galinsky

    ()
    (Kellogg School of Management - Northwestern University)

Abstract

The current research explores the impact of power on temporal commitment preference (an individual?s preference for shorter or longer time durations for agreements in decision making situations) across three countries: Portugal, Turkey, and the United States. A pilot study (N = 356) established cultural differences in uncertainty avoidance, which was expected to impact choices and behaviors involving power and temporality. The main study (N = 433) investigated the relationship between power and temporal commitment preference. Across all countries, high power individuals preferred shorter temporal commitments than low power individuals. In addition, the U.S. participants preferred longer temporal commitments than either the Portuguese or Turkish participants. We argue that differences in uncertainty avoidance help explain some of the differences in individuals? temporal commitment preferences across diverse cultural settings. Implications for practice and future directions are also discussed.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://globadvantage.ipleiria.pt/files/2009/10/working_paper-42_globadvantage.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by globADVANTAGE, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria in its series Working Papers with number 42.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 25 Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pil:wpaper:42

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://globadvantage.ipleiria.pt
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Power; Time; National culture; Uncertainty avoidance;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Jesuino, Jorge Correia, 2002. "Latin europe cluster: from South to North," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-89, April.
  2. Kabasakal, Hayat & Bodur, Muzaffer, 2002. "Arabic cluster: a bridge between East and West," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 40-54, April.
  3. Shelley, Marjorie K., 1994. "Gain/Loss Asymmetry in Risky Intertemporal Choice," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 124-159, July.
  4. Keren, Gideon & Roelofsma, Peter, 1995. "Immediacy and Certainty in Intertemporal Choice," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 287-297, September.
  5. Pinkley, Robin L. & Neale, Margaret A. & Bennett, Rebecca J., 1994. "The Impact of Alternatives to Settlement in Dyadic Negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 97-116, January.
  6. Ashkanasy, Neal M. & Trevor-Roberts, Edwin & Earnshaw, Louise, 2002. "The Anglo Cluster: legacy of the British empire," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 28-39, April.
  7. Benson III, Lehman & Beach, Lee Roy, 1996. "The Effects of Time Constraints on the Prechoice Screening of Decision Options," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 222-228, August.
  8. Okhuysen, Gerardo A. & Galinsky, Adam D. & Uptigrove, Tamara A., 2003. "Saving the worst for last: The effect of time horizon on the efficiency of negotiating benefits and burdens," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 269-279, July.
  9. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-91, March.
  10. Drazen Prelec & George Loewenstein, 1991. "Decision Making Over Time and Under Uncertainty: A Common Approach," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 37(7), pages 770-786, July.
  11. Brock, David M. & Barry, David & Thomas, David C., 2000. ""Your forward is our reverse, your right, our wrong": rethinking multinational planning processes in light of national culture," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(6), pages 687-701, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pil:wpaper:42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Nuno Reis).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.