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Social Norms and Preferences, Chapter for the Handbook for Social Economics, Edited by J. Benhabib, A. Bisin and M. Jackson

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  • Andrew Postlewaite

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

Social norms are often posited as an explanation of differences in economic behavior and performance of societies that are difficult to explain by differences in endowments and technology. Economists are often reluctant to incorporate social aspects into their analyses when doing so leads to models that depart from the “standard” model. I discuss ways that agents’ social environment can be accommodated in standard models and the advantages and disadvantages of doing so.

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File URL: http://economics.sas.upenn.edu/system/files/working-papers/10-031.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania in its series PIER Working Paper Archive with number 10-031.

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Length: 48 pages
Date of creation: 01 May 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:10-031

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Keywords: Social norms; social preferences; interdependent preferences; social behavior;

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References

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  1. Raquel Fernandez & Alessandra Fogli, 2005. "Culture: an empirical investigation of beliefs, work, and fertility," Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis 361, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Raquel Fernández & Alessandra Fogli & Claudia Olivetti, 2004. "Mothers and Sons: Preference Formation and Female Labor Force Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1249-1299, November.
  3. Raquel Fernández & Alessandra Fogli, 2005. "Fertility: The Role of Culture and Family Experience," NBER Working Papers 11569, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Okuno-Fujiwara Masahiro & Postlewaite Andrew, 1995. "Social Norms and Random Matching Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 79-109, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Roland Olbrich & Martin F. Quaas & Stefan Baumgaertner, 2011. "Personal norms of sustainability and their impact on management – The case of rangeland management in semi-arid regions," Working Paper Series in Economics, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics 209, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.

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