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Structural Estimation and Policy Evaluation in Developing Countries

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  • Petra E. Todd

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

  • Kenneth I. Wolpin

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of discrete choice dynamic programming (DCDP) methods for evaluating policies of particular relevance to developing countries, such as policies to reduce child labor and increase school attendance, to improve school quality, to affect immigration flows, to expand old age pension benefits, or to foster small business investment through microfinance. We describe the DCDP framework and how it relates to static models, illustrate its application with an example related to conditional cash transfer programs, consider numerous empirical applications from the literature of how the DCDP methodology has been used to address substantively important policy issues, and discuss methods for model validation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania in its series PIER Working Paper Archive with number 09-028.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 24 Jul 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:09-028

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Keywords: development economics; policy evaluation; dynamic discrete choice models; schooling; migration;

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Cited by:
  1. Yu Zheng & Juan Pantano, 2012. "Using Subjective Expectations Data to Allow for Unobserved Heterogeneity in Hotz-Miller Estimation Strategies," 2012 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 940, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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