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An On-the-Job Search Model of Crime, Inequality, and Unemployment

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  • Kenneth Burdett

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

  • Ricardo Lagos

    ()
    (Department of Economics, New York University)

  • Randall Wright

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

We extend simple search-theoretic models of crime, unemployment and inequality to incorporate on-the-job search. This is valuable because, although the simple models can be used to illustrate some important points concerning the economics of crime, on-the-job search models are more relevant empirically as well as more interesting in terms of the types of equilibria they generate. We characterize crime decisions, unemployment, and the equilibrium wage distribution. We use quantitative methods to illustrate key results, including a multiplicity of equilibria with different unemployment and crime rates, and to discuss the effects of changes in labor market and anti-crime policies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania in its series PIER Working Paper Archive with number 03-030.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 04 Sep 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:03-030

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Keywords: Crime; Inequality; Unemployment; Search; Turnov;

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References

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  1. Albrecht, James W & Axell, Bo, 1983. "An Equilibrium Model of Search Unemployment," Working Paper Series 99, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  2. Dale Mortensen, 1984. "Job Search and Labor Market Analysis," Discussion Papers 594, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  3. Imrohoroglu, Ayse & Merlo, Antonio & Rupert, Peter, 1996. "On the political economy of income redistribution and crime," Bulletins 7497, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  4. Glaeser, Edward L & Sacerdote, Bruce & Scheinkman, Jose A, 1996. "Crime and Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 507-48, May.
  5. Alexander Tabarrok, 1997. "A simple model of crime waves, riots, and revolutions," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 25(3), pages 274-288, September.
  6. Richard B. Freeman, 1996. "Why Do So Many Young American Men Commit Crimes and What Might We Do about It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 25-42, Winter.
  7. Melvyn G. Coles, 2001. "Equilibrium Wage Dispersion, Firm Size and Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 159-187, January.
  8. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "New developments in models of search in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 39, pages 2567-2627 Elsevier.
  9. Sah, Raaj K, 1991. "Social Osmosis and Patterns of Crime," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(6), pages 1272-95, December.
  10. Fender, John, 1999. "A general equilibrium model of crime and punishment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 437-453, July.
  11. Kenneth Burdett & Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2003. "Crime, Inequality, and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1764-1777, December.
  12. Diamond, Peter A., 1971. "A model of price adjustment," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 156-168, June.
  13. Jeff Grogger, 1997. "Market Wages and Youth Crime," NBER Working Papers 5983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Burdett, Kenneth & Mortensen, Dale T, 1998. "Wage Differentials, Employer Size, and Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(2), pages 257-73, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ricardo Lagos & Nobuhiro Kiyotaki, 2004. "A Model of Job and Worker Flows," 2004 Meeting Papers 36, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Giovanni Mastrobuoni & Paolo Pinotti, 2011. "Migration Restrictions and Criminal Behavior: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 208, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  3. Calvó-Armengol, Antoni & Zenou, Yves, 2003. "Social Networks and Crime Decisions: The Role of Social Structure in Facilitating Delinquent Behaviour," CEPR Discussion Papers 3966, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Donato Masciandaro, Francesco Passarelli, 2011. "Financial Systemic Risk: Taxation or Regulation?," ISLA Working Papers 41, ISLA, Centre for research on Latin American Studies and Transition Economies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
  5. Ignacio Munyo, . "The Juvenile Crime Dilemma," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Maria Cracolici & Teodora Uberti, 2009. "Geographical distribution of crime in Italian provinces: a spatial econometric analysis," Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 1-28, February.
  7. Giovanni Mastrobuoni & Paolo Pinotti, 2011. "Legal status of immigrants and criminal behavior: evidence from a natural experiment," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 813, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  8. Juin-jen Chang & Chi-Hsin Wu, 2012. "Crime, Job Searches, and Economic Growth," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(1), pages 3-19, March.
  9. Cysne, Rubens Penha & Turchick, David, 2012. "Equilibrium unemployment-inequality correlation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 454-469.
  10. Kenneth Burdett & Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2003. "Crime, Inequality, and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1764-1777, December.
  11. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Samrat Bhattacharya & Rudra Sensarma, 2011. "An Analysis of the Factors Determining Crime in England and Wales: A Quantile Regression Approach," Discussion Papers 11-12, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
  12. Akerlund, David & Golsteyn, Bart H.H. & Grönqvist, Hans & Lindahl, Lena, 2014. "Time Preferences and Criminal Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 8168, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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