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Financial Architecture and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Tanzania

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  • Christopher Adam
  • Peter Montiel

Abstract

In the vast majority of low-income countries, financing and political constraints have traditionally impaired the usefulness of fiscal policy as a short-run stabilization device. Indeed, it is widely recognized that fiscal policy in such countries has very often tended to be pro-cyclical. While fiscal dominance has also impaired the effectiveness of monetary policy, this situation has been changing, as many low-income countries have increased the independence of their central banks. These newly-independent central banks have taken center stage in the conduct of short-run macroeconomic stabilization in such countries, not just because they are in a position to exploit the traditional flexibility advantage of monetary policy, but also because they tend to be the primary locus of macroeconomic expertise in low-income countries.�

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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number WPS/2012-03.

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Date of creation: 03 Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:wps/2012-03

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  1. Roe, Alan R & Sowa, Nii K, 1997. "From Direct to Indirect Monetary Control in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(1), pages 212-64, March.
  2. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-76, December.
  3. Angeliki Kourelis & Carlo Cottarelli, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 94/39, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
  5. Carlo Cottarelli & Angeliki Kourelis, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 41(4), pages 587-623, December.
  6. Sm ali Abbas & Yuri v. Sobolev, 2009. "High And Volatile Treasury Yields In Tanzania: The Role Of Strategic Bidding And Auction Microstructure," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(2), pages 257-281, 06.
  7. Fabio C. Bagliano & Carlo A. Favero, . "Measuring Monetary Policy with VAR Models: an Evaluation," Working Papers 132, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
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Cited by:
  1. Mishra, Prachi & Montiel, Peter, 2013. "How effective is monetary transmission in low-income countries? A survey of the empirical evidence," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 187-216.

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