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Risk Sharing Relations and Enforcement Mechanisms

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  • Abigail Barr
  • Marleen Dekker

Abstract

We investigate whether the set of available enforcement mechanisms affects the formation of risk sharing relations by applying dyadic regression analysis to data from a specifically designed behavioural experiment, two surveys and a genealogical mapping exercise.� During the experiment participants are invited to form risk sharing relations under three institutional environments, each associated with different enforcement mechanisms: external, intrinsic, and endogenous extrinsic, i.e., the threat of (partial) social exclusion.� Dyads who are similar in age and gender, genetically related, or who belong to the same organizations with an economic purpose are more likely to share risk.� However, the latter are associated with less risk sharing when endogenous extrinsic incentives can be applied, while co-membership in religious congregations and being related by marriage support enforcement through such incentives.� We find no evidence of assortative grouping on risk preferences but, ex post, co-group members' risk-taking behavior converges.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number WPS/2008-14.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2008
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:wps/2008-14

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Cited by:
  1. Christine Binzel & Dietmar Fehr, 2010. "Social Relationships and Trust," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2010-028, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  2. Marcel Fafchamps & Eliana La Ferrara, 2012. "Self-Help Groups and Mutual Assistance: Evidence from Urban Kenya," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 707 - 733.
  3. Abigail Barr & Mattea Stein, 2008. "Status and egalitarianism in traditional communities: An analysis of funeral attendance in six Zimbabwean villages," CSAE Working Paper Series 2008-26, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Margherita Comola & Marcel Fafchamps, 2009. "Testing unilateral and bilateral link formation," PSE Working Papers halshs-00574971, HAL.
  5. Friebel, Guido & Gallego, Juan Miguel & Mendola, Mariapia, 2011. "Xenophobic Attacks, Migration Intentions and Networks: Evidence from the South of Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 5920, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00574971 is not listed on IDEAS

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