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Externality and framing effects in a bribery experiment

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  • Abigail Barr
  • Danila Serra

Abstract

Using a simple one-shot bribery game, we find evience of a negative externality effect and a framing effect.� When the losses suffered by a third parties due to a bribe being offered and accepted are increased bribes are less likely to be offered and accepted.� And when the game is presented as a bribery scenario instead of in abstract terms bribes are less likely to be offered and accepted.� We discuss two possible reasons as to why our experiment leads to the identification of these effects while previous experiments did not.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number WPS/2007-16.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2007
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:wps/2007-16

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Keywords: Corruption; Economic Experiment; Social Preferences;

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  1. Eckel, Catherine C. & Grossman, Philip J., 1996. "Altruism in Anonymous Dictator Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 181-191, October.
  2. Klaus Abbink & Bernd Irlenbusch & Elke Renner, 2002. "An Experimental Bribery Game," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(2), pages 428-454, October.
  3. Klaus Abbink, 2006. "Laboratory experiments on corruption," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series archive-38, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  4. Klaus Abbink, 2000. "Fair Salaries and the Moral Costs of Corruption," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse1_2000, University of Bonn, Germany.
  5. Klaus Abbink & Heike Hennig-Schmidt, 2006. "Neutral versus loaded instructions in a bribery experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 103-121, June.
  6. L. Cameron & A. Chaudhuri & N. Erkal & L. Gangadharan, 2005. "Do Attitudes Towards Corruption Differ Across Cultures? Experimental Evidence from Australia, India, Indonesia andSingapore," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 943, The University of Melbourne.
  7. Volodymyr Bilotkach, 2006. "A Tax Evasion - Bribery Game: Experimental Evidence from Ukraine," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 3(1), pages 31-49, June.
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