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Japanese Labour Markets: Can we Expect Significant Change?

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Author Info

  • Rebick, M.

Abstract

I examine recent changes in labour markets and employment practices in Japan. I find little evidence that Japan is converging towards an Anglo-American type labour market. Mobility rates continue to be low, and there is little indication that this will change greatly in the future. Large firms will continue to be reluctant to hire women into line management positions, and women will continue to dominate the continent workforce in Japan. There is likely to be a change in the nature of assessment and rewards leading to greater dispersion in pay, especially for managers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 9921.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:9921

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Keywords: LABOUR ; ECONOMICS ; EMPLOYMENT;

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Cited by:
  1. Junya Hamaaki & Masahiro Hori & Saeko Maeda & Keiko Murata, 2012. "Changes in the Japanese Employment System in the Two Lost Decades," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(4), pages 810-846, October.
  2. Ono, Hiroshi, 2004. "Divorce in Japan: Why It Happens, Why It Doesn’t," EIJS Working Paper Series 201, The European Institute of Japanese Studies, revised 26 Jan 2006.
  3. Hiroshi Ono & Marcus E. Rebick, 2003. "Constraints on the Level and Efficient Use of Labor in Japan," NBER Working Papers 9484, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Arjan Keizer, 2011. "Flexibility in Japanese internal labour markets: The introduction of performance-related pay," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 573-594, September.
  5. Satoshi Shimizutani & Izumi Yokoyama, 2006. "Has Japan's Long-term employment Practice Survived? New Evidence Emerging Since the 1990s," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d06-182, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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