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Empirical Evidence on Growth Spillovers from China to New Zealand

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Author Info

  • Denise R Osborn
  • Tugrul Vehbi

    ()
    (The Treasury)

Abstract

This paper provides a quantitative analysis of the impact on New Zealand of economic growth in China through the framework of an econometric model. The analysis compares the roles of China and the US both for growth in New Zealand and also for world commodity prices, the latter being important for New Zealand as an exporter of primary products. Finally, in the light of the increasing role of China in the world economy over the last two to three decades, the paper also investigates whether spillover effects from China to New Zealand have changed over this period. Using models estimated from the mid- 1980s to 2011, we find that growth spillovers from China are important for New Zealand, with estimates of the accumulated increase in domestic GDP from a one percent increase in output growth in China being in the range of around 0.2 to 0.4 percent. It is striking that growth spillovers are substantially greater from the US than from China, despite the latter's increasing importance in the world economy. Both domestic and foreign shocks have been important drivers of real exchange rate fluctuations, while the contribution of the latter has been relatively more important. The time-varying estimates provide some evidence of time-variation, with the greatest impact from China applying for about a decade from the mid-1990s, but also being relatively large in the latter part of our sample period.

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File URL: http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2013/13-17/twp13-17.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by New Zealand Treasury in its series Treasury Working Paper Series with number 13/17.

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Length: Structural VAR, growth spillovers, commodity prices
Date of creation: Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:13/17

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Keywords: C32; E32; F43; F44;

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  1. Kiyotaka Sato & Zhaoyong Zhang & Michael McAleer, 2010. "Identifying Shocks in Regionally Integrated East Asian Economies with Structural VAR and Block Exogeneity," Working Papers in Economics 10/23, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Tilak Abeysinghe & Gulasekaran Rajaguru, 2003. "Quarterly Real GDP Estimates for China and ASEAN4 with a Forecast Evaluation," Departmental Working Papers wp0404, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
  3. Jarkko Jääskelä & Penelope Smith, 2011. "Terms of Trade Shocks: What are They and What Do They Do?," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2011-05, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  4. Tamim Bayoumi & Andrew Swiston, 2009. "Foreign Entanglements: Estimating the Source and Size of Spillovers Across Industrial Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(2), pages 353-383, June.
  5. Buckle, Robert A. & Kim, Kunhong & Kirkham, Heather & McLellan, Nathan & Sharma, Jarad, 2007. "A structural VAR business cycle model for a volatile small open economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 990-1017, November.
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