Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Demography of an Early Mortality Transition: Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality Rates for Britain's Royals, 1500-1799

Contents:

Author Info

  • Paul A. David

    ()
    (Stanford University & All Souls College, Oxford)

  • S. Ryan Johansson

    (Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Family Social Structure, Cambridge University)

  • Andrea Pozzi

    (Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (Rome))

Abstract

This paper details the statistical sources, methods and findings that underpin the demographic evidence offered by Johansson (2010) in support of her thesis regarding “Europe’s first knowledge-driven mortality transition,” namely the pronounced and sustained rise in the expectations of life that took place among the 17th and early 18th century birth cohorts of members of Britain’s royal families. The consequent interest in exposing the existence of systematic demographic effects of changes in the medical treatments and healthcare regimens received by this elite makes it germane to establish the statistical significance of a particular pattern of inter-cohort changes in the royals’ mortality experience – namely, one whose timing and age- and sexspecificity make it plausibly attributable to the historical improvements in the medical knowledge and practice of their doctors, as has been documented by Johansson (1999, 2010). Complete genealogical data for the members of Britain’s royal families born c. 1500 – c.1800, due to Weir (1996), permits construction of cohort life expectancy at birth and at age 25 for royal males, royal females, as well as for the small number of male monarchs, their female consorts and the queens. Inter-cohort comparisons of life table mortality schedules are obtained by using the 5-year average survival rate distributions for the successive birth cohorts to estimate for each cohort the parameters of Anson’s (1991) general model of age-specific mortality hazard rates – the empirical probability of dying within 5 years of age x, conditional on having survived to that age. A variety of tests show the gross changes of interest to be statistically significant. The discussion contrasts the mortality transition among the royal families’ members with the contemporaneous demographic experience of rural and urban segments of the English population at large.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/4429/djp83.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford in its series Oxford University Economic and Social History Series with number _083.

as in new window
Length: 62 pages
Date of creation: 15 Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nuf:esohwp:_083

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Offer, Avner & Pechey, Rachel & Ulijaszek, Stanley, 2010. "Obesity under affluence varies by welfare regimes: The effect of fast food, insecurity, and inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 297-308, December.
  2. Astorga, Pablo, 2012. "Mean reversion in long-horizon real exchange rates: Evidence from Latin America," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1529-1550.
  3. Leigh A. Gardner, 2008. "To Take or to Make? Contracting for Legitimacy in the Emerging States of Twelfth-Century Britain," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _073, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  4. Avner Offer, 2008. "Charles Feinstein (1932-2004), and British Historical National Accounts," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _070, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  5. Guillaume Daudin, 2007. "Domestic Trade and Market Size in Late Eighteen Century France," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2007-35, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  6. Cliff T. Bekar and Clyde Reed, 2009. "Risk, Asset Markets and Inequality: Evidence from Medieval England," Economics Series Working Papers Number 79, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look at the French Fertility Decline Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model," Economics Series Working Papers 71, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  8. Mark Koyama, 2009. "The Price of Time and Labour Supply: From the Black Death to the Industrious Revolution," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _078, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  9. Avner Offer, 2008. "British Manual Workers: From Producers to Consumers, c. 1950–2000," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _074, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  10. Offer, Avner, 2008. "Charles Feinstein (1932–2005), And British Historical National Accounts," MPRA Paper 9489, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Leigh A. Gardner, 2008. "To Take or to Make? Contracting for Legitimacy in the Emerging States of Twelfth-Century Britain," Economics Series Working Papers 73, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  12. Roman Studer, 2007. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _068, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  13. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look At The French Fertility Decline Using An Agent-Based Simulation Model," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _071, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  14. C. Knick Harley, 2010. "Prices and Profits in Cotton Textiles During the Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers Number 81, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  15. Cliff T. Bekar & Clyde G. Reed, 2009. "Risk, Asset Markets, and Inequality: Evidence from Medieval England," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _079, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  16. David Chacko, 2009. "Medical Liability Litigation: An Historical Look at the Causes for Its Growth in the United Kingdom," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _077, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  17. Avner Offer, 2008. "Charles Feinstein (1932-2005), and British Historical National Accounts," Economics Series Working Papers Paper 70, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  18. David Chacko, 2009. "Medical Liability Litigation: An Historical Look at the Causes for Its Growth in the United Kingdom," Economics Series Working Papers Paper 77, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. S. Ryan Johansson, 2010. "Medics, Monarchs and Mortality, 1600-1800: Origins of the Knowledge-Driven Health Transition in Europe," Economics Series Working Papers Number85, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nuf:esohwp:_083. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Maxine Collett).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.