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Medical Liability Litigation: An Historical Look at the Causes for Its Growth in the United Kingdom

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  • David Chacko

    (School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania)

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    Abstract

    The frequency and severity of medical liability litigation in the United Kingdom have increased since the middle of the twentieth century. Recent estimates of settling out-standing negligence claims hover around at least 10 percent of the National Health Service’s total annual budget. This paper argues that the frequency and severity of these claims have increased as patients have been increasingly dissatisfied with the established complaints procedures and regulation of physicians and as doctors have seen their influence in the doctor–patient relationship decrease. The current litigation situation compared to the past is three pronged: doctors are being sued more often; when sued, they are more likely to lose; and when losing, the claims awarded against them are increasing in size. As patients become increasingly aware that doctors are more likely to lose when sued and that the courts are more likely to award larger set-tlements, the frequency with which doctors are sued will almost certainly escalate. This paper concludes by discussing no-fault compensation as an alternative to litigation that would likely reduce physicians’ susceptibility to litigation.

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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/3784/77chacko.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford in its series Oxford University Economic and Social History Series with number _077.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: 01 Apr 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:nuf:esohwp:_077

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    Web page: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/

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    1. Lupton, Deborah, 1997. "Consumerism, reflexivity and the medical encounter," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 373-381, August.
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    Cited by:
    1. Paul A. David & S. Ryan Johansson & Andrea Pozzi, 2010. "The Demography of an Early Mortality Transition: Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality Rates for Britain's Royals, 1500-1799," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _083, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

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