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Service Production and Patient Satisfaction in Primary Care

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Author Info

  • Fredrik Carlsen

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Jostein Grytten

    ()
    (Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway)

  • Irene Skau

    (Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Context: The institutional setting for the study was the primary physician service in Norway, where there is a regular general practitioner scheme. Each inhabitant has a statutory right to be registered with a regular general practitioner. There are large differences between physicians in service production. Objective: We studied whether difference in services production between physicians has an effect on how satisfied patients are with the services that are provided. Methodology: Data about patient satisfaction were obtained from a survey of a representative sample of the population. We obtained data about how satisfied the respondents were with waiting time to get an appointment and with two aspects of the quality of care they actually received: the amount of time the physician spent with them, and to what extent they perceived that the physician took their medical problems seriously. The survey data were merged with data on service production for the primary physician that the respondent was registered with. Service production was measured as the number of consultations per person on the list, and as the number of laboratory tests per consultation. Results: There was a positive and relatively strong association between the level of service production of the general practitioners and patient satisfaction with waiting time for a consultation. The association was weaker for satisfaction with the quality of care the respondents actually received. Conclusion: A high level of service production can be justified, since it increases patient satisfaction, particularly satisfaction with access to services.

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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2007/8Treatment%20satisfaction.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in its series Working Paper Series with number 9107.

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    Length: 23 pages
    Date of creation: 18 Dec 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:9107

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 7491 Trondheim
    Phone: 73 59 19 40
    Fax: 73 59 69 54
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    Web page: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/wp.htm
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    Keywords: primary physician services; patient satisfaction; service production; access;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Pascoe, Gregory C., 1983. "Patient satisfaction in primary health care: A literature review and analysis," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 6(3-4), pages 185-210, January.
    2. Ware, John E. & Davis, Allyson R., 1983. "Behavioral consequences of consumer dissatisfaction with medical care," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 6(3-4), pages 291-297, January.
    3. Hall, Judith A. & Dornan, Michael C., 1988. "What patients like about their medical care and how often they are asked: A meta-analysis of the satisfaction literature," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 935-939, January.
    4. John Nixon & Philippe Ulmann, 2006. "The relationship between health care expenditure and health outcomes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 7-18, March.
    5. Grytten, Jostein & Sørensen, Rune, 2008. "Busy physicians," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 510-518, March.
    6. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1999. "The impact of public spending on health: does money matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(10), pages 1309-1323, November.
    7. Carlsen, Fredrik & Grytten, Jostein, 2000. "Consumer satisfaction and supplier induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 731-753, September.
    8. Starfield, Barbara & Shi, Leiyu, 2002. "Policy relevant determinants of health: an international perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 201-218, June.
    9. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2003. "Practice variation and physician-specific effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 403-418, May.
    10. Margaret M. Byrne & Kenneth Pietz & LeChauncy Woodard & Laura A. Petersen, 2007. "Health care funding levels and patient outcomes: a national study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(4), pages 385-393.
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