Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Migration and dynamic agglomeration economies: Regional income growth in Norway

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jørn Rattsø

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Hildegunn E. Stokke

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

The existence of agglomeration economies is well established. We study dynamic agglomeration effects and expect regional income divergence when people move from the periphery to cities. We use distribution analysis, Kernel density functions and first order Markov chains, to investigate whether data from Norwegian regions 1972-2008 with strong urbanization are consistent with agglomeration effects. The analysis shows overall income convergence, contrary to the hypothesis of agglomeration economies. Regions with large increases in population do not show systematic higher income growth. The probabilities of moving up and down the income distribution are independent of the migration pattern. We conclude that strong dynamic agglomeration effects linked to inmigration are inconsistent with the data.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2011/2_jrhs_agglo_010211.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in its series Working Paper Series with number 11111.

as in new window
Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 01 Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:11111

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 7491 Trondheim
Phone: 73 59 19 40
Fax: 73 59 69 54
Email:
Web page: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/wp.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. PierrePhilippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon & Diego Puga & Sébastien Roux, 2009. "The Productivity Advantages of Large Cities: Distinguishing Agglomeration from Firm Selection," SERC Discussion Papers 0027, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  2. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent, 2008. "Spatial wage disparities: Sorting matters!," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 723-742, March.
  3. Jørn Rattsø & Hildegunn E. Stokke, 2011. "Accumulation of education and regional income growth: Limited human capital effects in Norway," Working Paper Series 11211, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  4. Joern Rattsoe & Hildegunn Ekroll Stokke, 2009. "Regional income convergence, skilled migration and productivity response: Explaining relative stagnation in the periphery," Working Paper Series 9809, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  5. Angel de la Fuente & Vicente Salas Fumás, . "On the sources of convergence: A close look at the Spanish regions," Studies on the Spanish Economy 01, FEDEA.
  6. Stein �stbye & Olle Westerlund, 2007. "Is Migration Important for Regional Convergence? Comparative Evidence for Norwegian and Swedish Counties, 1980-2000," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 901-915.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Hildegunn Stokke & Jørn Rattsø & Fredrik Carlsen, 2012. "Urban wage premium increasing with education level: Identification of agglomeration effects for Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa12p459, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Jørn Rattsø & Hildegunn E. Stokke, 2011. "Accumulation of education and regional income growth: Limited human capital effects in Norway," Working Paper Series 11211, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  3. Agarwalla, Astha, . "Agglomeration Economies and Productivity Growth in India," IIMA Working Papers WP2011-01-08, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
  4. Sevil Acar & Burhan Can Karahasan, 2013. "Uncovering Norway?S Regional Disparities With Respect To Natural Riches," ERSA conference papers ersa13p723, European Regional Science Association.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:11111. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marit Balstad Jensen) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Marit Balstad Jensen to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.