Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Right-to-Work Laws and State-Level Economic Outcomes: Evidence from the Case Studies of Idaho and Oklahoma Using Synthetic Control Method

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ozkan Eren

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

  • I. Serkan Ozbeklik

    ()
    (Robert Day School of Economics and Finance, Claremont McKenna College and University of Maryland, College Park)

Abstract

The role of right-to-work laws on state economies, labor organizations and employees are controversial and important policy questions. Empirical evidence is far from being conclusive predominantly due to identification issues. Using a recently developed econometric technique and exploiting the two most recent cases, -Idaho and Oklahoma- we examine the effectiveness of right-to-work laws on state-level outcomes. Our results indicate that the passage of right-to-work laws in Oklahoma affected union membership and coverage rates and, possibly to some extent, foreign direct investment. As for manufacturing employment, per capita income and average wage rates, we do not observe any impact. Our findings for Idaho, on the other hand, suggest that the laws increased the manufacturing employment, while it had no effect on per capita income and are inconclusive for foreign direct investment..

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://web.unlv.edu/projects/RePEc/pdf/1101.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1101 Classification-JEL J51, J58, J21.

as in new window
Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nlv:wpaper:1101

Contact details of provider:
Phone: (702) 895-3776
Fax: (702) 895-1354
Web page: http://business.unlv.edu/econ/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Manufacturing Employment; Right-to-Work Laws; Synthetic Control Method; Unionization;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
  2. Barry T. Hirsch & David A. Macpherson, 2003. "Union Membership and Coverage Database from the Current Population Survey: Note," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(2), pages 349-354, January.
  3. John A. List & Daniel L. Millimet & Per G. Fredriksson & W. Warren McHone, 2003. "Effects of Environmental Regulations on Manufacturing Plant Births: Evidence from a Propensity Score Matching Estimator," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 944-952, November.
  4. Charlene M. Kalenkoski & Donald J. Lacombe, 2006. "Right-to-work Laws and Manufacturing Employment: The Importance of Spatial Dependence," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 402–418, October.
  5. Barry T. Hirsch, 1980. "The determinants of unionization: An analysis of interarea differences," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(2), pages 147-161, January.
  6. Alberto Abadie & Javier Gardeazabal, 2003. "The Economic Costs of Conflict: A Case Study of the Basque Country," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 113-132, March.
  7. Thomas J. Holmes, 1996. "The effects of state policies on the location of industry: evidence from state borders," Staff Report 205, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  8. Wolfgang Keller & Arik Levinson, 2002. "Pollution Abatement Costs and Foreign Direct Investment Inflows to U.S. States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 691-703, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Dan S. Rickman, 2013. "Should Oklahoma Be More Like Texas? A Taxing Decision," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 1-22, Summer.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nlv:wpaper:1101. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bill Robinson).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.