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Knowledge and Economic Growth

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  • Nahuis, R.

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

This thesis is centered around two empirical questions. The first question deals with the paradox that the ICT revolution does not pay off with higher productivity growth for the ICT- users. The interaction between production and knowledge accumulation and the ¿general- purpose' nature of the ICT revolution is examined to explain the paradoxical finding. The second question ¿ what explains the increase in wage inequality between high-skilled and low-skilled workers over the last two decades ¿ is studied from several angles. The role for trade is assessed alongside of different technology-based explanations. Both questions are addressed from a uniform conceptual framework emphasizing the importance of knowledge and knowledge spillovers for understanding modern economic growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-83771.

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Length: 355
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published
Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-83771

Note: Dissertation
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Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

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  1. Wood, Adrian, 1998. "Globalisation and the Rise in Labour Market Inequalities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1463-82, September.
  2. Young, Alwyn, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-80, August.
  3. Alwyn Young, 1998. "Growth without Scale Effects," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(1), pages 41-63, February.
  4. Yang, Xiaokai & Heijdra, Ben J, 1993. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 295-301, March.
  5. Mehmet Yorukoglu, 1998. "The Information Technology Productivity Paradox," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(2), pages 551-592, April.
  6. Groot, H.L.F. de, 1998. "Economic Growth, Sectoral Structure and Unemployment," Open Access publications from Tilburg University, Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-76807, Tilburg University.
  7. Young, Alwyn, 1994. "Lessons from the East Asian NICS: A contrarian view," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 964-973, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Bretschger, Lucas & Smulders, Sjak, 2000. "Explaining environmental Kuznets curves: How pollution induces policy and new technologies," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Diskussionspapiere 12/2000, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Faculty of Law and Economics.

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