Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Ambiguity aversion and heterogeneity in financial markets: An empirical and theoretical perspective

Contents:

Author Info

  • Pataracchia, B.

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

The financial crisis has warned modelers and policy makers about the inadequacy of existing macroeconomic models in explaining financial facts and in supporting the analysis of policies’ impact. This thesis assesses the contribution of assuming heterogeneity among investors and deviation from the rational expectations framework in order to explain the complex interlinkages between macroeconomic aggregates and financial risk. Chapter 2 provides an empirical analysis of a representative-investor consumption based asset pricing model with recursive ambiguity adverse preferences. Chapter 3 assesses the theoretical implications of ambiguity averse preference in the presence of time-varying perceived risk. Finally, the last chapter presents an asset pricing model with heterogeneous ambiguity attitudes showing that their interaction is able to reproduce the waves of optimism and pessimism observed in the asset prices series.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://arno.uvt.nl/show.cgi?fid=130195
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 404 Not Found. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Economists Online Support)
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-5905989.

as in new window
Length: 97
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published
Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-5905989

Note: Dissertation
Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Fabio Trojani & Markus Leippold & Paolo Vanini, 2005. "Learning and Asset Prices under Ambiguous Information," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2005 2005-03, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
  2. Youwei Li & Bas Donkers & Bertrand Melenberg, 2010. "Econometric analysis of microscopic simulation models," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(10), pages 1187-1201.
  3. Phillippe Weil, 1997. "The Equity Premium Puzzle and the Risk-Free Rate Puzzle," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1833, David K. Levine.
  4. Campbell, John & Cochrane, John, 2000. "Explaining the Poor Performance of Consumption-Based Asset Pricing Models," Scholarly Articles 3163265, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  5. Andrew B. Abel, 1998. "Risk Premia and Term Premia in General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 6683, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Pascal J. Maenhout, 2004. "Robust Portfolio Rules and Asset Pricing," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(4), pages 951-983.
  7. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Pok-sang Lam & Nelson C. Mark, 1998. "Asset Pricing with Distorted Beliefs: Are Equity Returns Too Good To Be True?," NBER Working Papers 6354, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. William A. Brock & Cars H. Hommes, 1997. "A Rational Route to Randomness," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1059-1096, September.
  9. Brock, William A. & Hommes, Cars H., 1998. "Heterogeneous beliefs and routes to chaos in a simple asset pricing model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(8-9), pages 1235-1274, August.
  10. Amilon, Henrik, 2008. "Estimation of an adaptive stock market model with heterogeneous agents," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 342-362, March.
  11. R. Mehra & E. Prescott, 2010. "The equity premium: a puzzle," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1401, David K. Levine.
  12. Blume, Lawrence & Easley, David, 1992. "Evolution and market behavior," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 9-40, October.
  13. Timothy Cogley & ThomasJ. Sargent, 2009. "Diverse Beliefs, Survival and the Market Price of Risk," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(536), pages 354-376, 03.
  14. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
  15. Alvaro Sandroni, 2000. "Do Markets Favor Agents Able to Make Accurate Predicitions?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(6), pages 1303-1342, November.
  16. Hansen, Lars Peter & Sargent, Thomas J., 2005. "Robust estimation and control under commitment," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 124(2), pages 258-301, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-5905989. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Economists Online Support).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.