Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Two subjective definitions of poverty: Results from the Wisconsin basic needs study

Contents:

Author Info

  • Colasanto , D.
  • Gaag, J. van der
  • Kapteyn, A.J.

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

We test two hypotheses about the relationship between age and reported difficulty paying bills or buying things the family needs, such as food, clothing, medicine, and medical care. The affluence-trajectory hypothesis follows from age-group differences ...

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://arno.uvt.nl/show.cgi?fid=69281
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364721.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1984
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Human Resources (1984) v.19, p.127-138
Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364721

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Moepeng, Pelotshweu T. & Tisdell, Clement A., 2008. "Can Subjective Measures for Rapid Assessment of Rural Poverty and Inequality be Useful in Botswana?," Social Economics, Policy and Development Working Papers 123547, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  2. Armin Falk & Markus Knell, . "Choosing the Joneses On the Endogeneity of Reference Groups," IEW - Working Papers 053, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  3. Timm Bönke & Carsten Schröder, 2010. "Country Inequality Rankings and Conversion Schemes," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1068, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. John Knight & Ramani Gunatilaka, 2009. "Income, Aspirations and the Hedonic Treadmill in a Poor Society," Economics Series Working Papers 468, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Udaya Wagle, 2007. "Poverty in Kathmandu: What do subjective and objective economic welfare concepts suggest?," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 73-95, April.
  6. Robin Douthitt & Maurice Macdonald & Randolph Mullis, 1992. "The relationship between measures of subjective and economic well-being: A new look," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 407-422, June.
  7. Bjorn Gustafsson & Ximing Yue, 2012. "Rural people's perception of income adequacy in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(3), pages 264-280, October.
  8. John Knight & Ramani Gunatilak, 2014. "Subjective Well-being and Social Evaluation in a Poor Country," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-09, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  9. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Yue, Ximing, 2006. "Rural People’s Perception of Poverty in China," IZA Discussion Papers 2486, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Yoram Amiel, 1998. "The subjective approach to the measurement of income inequality," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6595, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Abigail Barr & David Clark, 2007. "A Multidimensional Analysis of Adaptation in a Developing Country Context," CSAE Working Paper Series 2007-19, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  12. Thesia I. Garner & Kathleen Short, 2005. "Personal Assessments of Minimum Income and Expenses: What Do They Tell Us about 'Minimum Living' Thresholds and Equivalence Scales?," Working Papers 379, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  13. Thesia I. Garner & Kathleen Short, 2005. "Economic Well-Being Based on Income, Consumer Expenditures and Personal Assessments of Minimal Needs," Working Papers 381, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  14. Pradhan, Menno & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Measuring poverty using qualitative perceptions of welfare," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2011, The World Bank.
  15. Yoram Amiel, 1998. "The Subjective Approach to the Measurement of Income Inequality (published in Handbook of Income Inequality Measurement, J Silber (ed), Kluwer Academic Publishers (1999), pp.227-241)," STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers 38, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  16. David A. Clark, 2005. "Core Poverty, Basic Capabilities and Vagueness: An Application to the South African Context," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-026, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364721. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Economists Online Support).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.