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Pluralism in economics: A public good or a public bad?

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  • Dalen, H.P. van

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

A pluralist approach to economics is both necessary from anacademic as well a policy point of view. From an academicviewpoint pluralism can be understood as the outcome ofcompetition and specialization in the search for new ideasthat can deal with imperfections of the real world. From apolicy point of view a diversity of view is also desirableas it helps to spread the risk of large mistakes in policychoices. However, the present-day teaching practices andtextbooks are by and large not well suited to deal with apluralist approach. Possible routes of that can help to enrichteaching and curricula are: (1) teaching the art of economicpolicy; (2) stress teaching economics by learning from the past;(3) teach by becoming imperialist so that a conversationbetween discipline gets underway; (4) merge business andgeneral economics as the dividing line between the two isnowadays quite thin; (5) practice Reality Economics; and(6) teach basic principles (especially in the bachelors stage)in a ‘Socratesian’ manner, i.e. let students learn economicsby doing (e.g. by experimental economics or interviewingbusinessmen).

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-347616.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-347616

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Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

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  1. Romer, Paul, 1994. "New goods, old theory, and the welfare costs of trade restrictions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 5-38, February.
  2. David Colander, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0304, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
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  7. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 1997. "The Golden Age of Nobel Economists," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-120/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  8. Arjo Klamer & Hendrik van Dalen, 2001. "Attention and the art of scientific publishing," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 289-315.
  9. McCloskey, Donald N, 1983. "The Rhetoric of Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 481-517, June.
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  11. Brock, W.A. & Durlauf, S.N., 1997. "A Formal Model of Theory Vhoice in Science," Working papers 9707, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  12. Hazlett, Thomas W, 1998. "Assigning Property Rights to Radio Spectrum Users: Why Did FCC License Auctions Take 67 Years?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(2), pages 529-75, October.
  13. Daniel Klein, 2001. "Plea to Economists Who Favor Liberty: Assist the Everyman," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 185-202, Spring.
  14. Edward P. Lazear, 1998. "Diversity and Immigration," NBER Working Papers 6535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Richard Lipsey, 2001. "Successes and failures in the transformation of economics," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 169-201.
  16. Tirole, Jean, 1994. "The Internal Organization of Government," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(1), pages 1-29, January.
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  22. repec:dgr:uvatin:2000032 is not listed on IDEAS
  23. S. N. Durlauf, . "A Framework for the Study of Individual Behavior and Social Interactions," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1220-01, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  24. Hendrik P. van Dalen & Kene Henkens, 2000. "What makes a Scientific Article influential?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 00-032/1, Tinbergen Institute.
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Cited by:
  1. Birolo, Adriano & Rosselli, Annalisa, 2009. "Research standards for the Italian young academics: what has changed over the last thirty years?," MPRA Paper 21368, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Bruno Frey, 2006. "How Influential is Economics?," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 295-311, June.
  3. Andrew Mearman & Tim Wakeley & Gamila Shoib & Don J. Webber, 2011. "Does Pluralism in Economics Education Make Better Educated, Happier Students? A Qualitative Analysis," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 50-62.

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