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Government spending cycles: Ideological or opportunistic?

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  • Dalen, H.P. van

    (Tilburg University)

  • Swank, O.H.

Abstract

This paper examines whether partisan and opportunistic motives affect government expenditure growth in the Netherlands. The time series analysis, covering the period 1953-93, allows for different types of government spending. In general, spending is inspired by ideological and opportunistic motives: all government expenditure categories show an upward drift during election times and the 'partisan' motives behind government spending are clearly revealed: cabinets attach greater importance to social security and healthcare than right-wing cabinets and right-wing cabinets value expenditure on infrastructure and defense more than left-wing parties. Copyright 1996 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-3107371.

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Date of creation: 1996
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Publication status: Published in Public Choice (1996) v.89, p.183-200
Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-3107371

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Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

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Cited by:
  1. Bos, Frits, 2006. "De Nederlandse collectieve uitgaven in historisch perspectief
    [Dutch public expenditure in historical perspective]
    ," MPRA Paper 40602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Dash, Bharatee Bhusana & Raja, Angara V., 2012. "Political Determinants of the Allocation of Public Expenditures: A Study of the Indian States," Working Papers 12/101, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
  3. Bharatee Dash & Angara Raja, 2013. "Do political determinants affect the size and composition of public expenditure? A study of the Indian states," International Review of Economics, Springer, vol. 60(3), pages 293-317, September.
  4. Kammas, Pantelis, 2009. "Strategic fiscal interaction among OECD countries," MPRA Paper 15841, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Peter Zweifel, 2006. "Auftrag und Grenzen der Sozialen Krankenversicherung," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(s1), pages 5-26, 05.
  6. Bischoff, Ivo & Gohout, Wolfgang, 2006. "Tax projections in German states – manipulated by opportunistic incumbent parties?," Finanzwissenschaftliche Arbeitspapiere 74, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Fachbereich Wirtschaftswissenschaften.
  7. Zohal Hessami, 2013. "Corruption, Public Procurement, and the Budget Composition: Theory and Evidence from OECD Countries," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-27, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  8. Vincenzo Bove & Georgios Efthyvoulou & Antonio Navas, 2013. "Political Cycles in Public Expenditure: Butter vs Guns," Working Papers 2013016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  9. Sturm, Jan-Egbert, 2001. "Determinants of public capital spending in less-developed countries," CCSO Working Papers 200107, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
  10. Kausik Chaudhuri & Sugato Dasgupta, 2005. "The political determinants of central governments' economic policies in India: an empirical investigation," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(7), pages 957-978.
  11. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2003. "Domestic political and external security determinants of the demand for greek military expenditure," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 437-445.
  12. Jakob Haan & Jan Sturm & Bernd Sikken, 1996. "Government capital formation: Explaining the decline," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 55-74, March.
  13. Hessami, Zohal, 2010. "Corruption and the Composition of Public Expenditures: Evidence from OECD Countries," MPRA Paper 25945, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Cousins, Mel, 2007. "Political budget cycles and social security budget increases in the Republic of Ireland, 1923-2005," MPRA Paper 5359, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Makkonen, Teemu, 2013. "Government science and technology budgets in times of crisis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 817-822.

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