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A pint a day raises a man's pay, but smoking blows that gain away

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  • Ours, J.C. van

    (Tilburg University)

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Tilburg University in its series Open Access publications from Tilburg University with number urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-140957.

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    Date of creation: 2004
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    Publication status: Published in Journal of Health Economics (2004) v.23, p.863-886
    Handle: RePEc:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-140957

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    Web page: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

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    Cited by:
    1. van Ours, Jan C & Williams, Jenny, 2005. "Cannabis Prices and Dynamics of Cannabis Use," CEPR Discussion Papers 4991, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Vidhura Tennekoon & Robert Rosenman, 2013. "Bias in Measuring Smoking Behavior," Working Papers 2013-10, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
    3. Lisa R. Anderson & Jennifer M. Mellor, 2007. "Predicting Health Behaviors with an Experimental Measure of Risk Preference," Working Papers 59, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
    4. Ours, J.C. van, 2005. "Cannabis, Cocaine and the Wages of Prime Age Males," Discussion Paper 2005-14, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Brune, Lasse F., 2007. "The smoker's wage penalty puzzle: evidence from Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-31, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Clark, Andrew E. & Etilé, Fabrice, 2005. "Don't Give Up On Me Baby: Spousal Correlation in Smoking Behaviour," IZA Discussion Papers 1692, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Pinka Chatterji & Jeffrey DeSimone, 2006. "High School Alcohol Use and Young Adult Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 12529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Pinka Chatterji & Margarita Alegria & David Takeuchi, 2008. "Psychiatric Disorders and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the National Comorbidity Survey - Replication," NBER Working Papers 14404, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Massimiliano Bratti & Konstantinos Tatsiramos, 2012. "The effect of delaying motherhood on the second childbirth in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 291-321, January.
    10. Donata Bessey & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2009. "Marijuana Consumption, Educational Outcomes and Labor Market Success: Evidence from Switzerland," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0043, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
    11. Cowan, Benjamin W., 2011. "Forward-thinking teens: The effects of college costs on adolescent risky behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 813-825, October.
    12. Ours, J.C. van, 2005. "Dynamics in the Use of Drugs," Discussion Paper 2005-21, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    13. Anger, Silke & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2010. "Does Smoking Really Harm Your Earnings so Much? Biases in Current Estimates of the Smoking Wage Penalty," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 561-564.
    14. Cowan, Benjamin & Schwab, Benjamin, 2011. "The incidence of the healthcare costs of smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1094-1102.
    15. Stefanie Schurer, 2008. "Discrete Heterogeneity in the Impact of Health Shocks on Labour Market Outcomes," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2008n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    16. Silvia Balia & Andrew M. Jones, 2007. "Unravelling the influence of smoking initiation and cessation on premature mortality using a common latent factor model," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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