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How did Location Affect Adoption of the Commercial Internet? Global Village, Urban Density, and Industry Composition

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  • Chris Forman
  • Avi Goldfarb
  • Shane Greenstein

Abstract

The authors test opposing theories on how urban locations influenced the diffusion of Internet technology. They find evidence that, controlling for industry, participation in the Internet is more likely in rural areas than in urban areas. Nevertheless, talk of the dissolution of cities is premature. Frontier Internet technologies appear more often at establishments in urban areas, even with industry controls. Major urban areas also contain many establishments from information technology-intensive industries, whose presence could reinforce the concentration of frontier Internet technologies in these areas. However, information technology-intensive industries are numerous and widespread. Hence, so is the use of frontier technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9979.

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Date of creation: Sep 2003
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Publication status: published as Forman, Chris, Avi Goldfarb and Shane Greenstein. "How Did Location Affect Adoption Of The Commercial Internet? Global Village vs. Urban Leadership," Journal of Urban Economics, 2005, v58(3,Nov), 389-420.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9979

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Cited by:
  1. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S. & Ali, Kamar & Olfert, M. Rose, 2010. "Recent spatial growth dynamics in wages and housing costs: Proximity to urban production externalities and consumer amenities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 440-452, November.
  2. Bhadra, Dipasis & Kee, Jacqueline, 2008. "Structure and dynamics of the core US air travel markets: A basic empirical analysis of domestic passenger demand," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 27-39.
  3. Paul A. David, 2003. "Zvi Griliches and the Economics of Technology Diffusion: Adoption of Innovations, Investment Lags, and Productivity Growth," Discussion Papers 09-016, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, revised Mar 2010.
  4. Betsey Stevenson, 2009. "The Internet and Job Search," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 67-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Danielle Galliano & Pascale Roux, 2006. "Les inégalités spatiales dans l'usage des tic. Le cas des firmes industrielles françaises," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 57(6), pages 1449-1475.
  6. Battisti, Giuliana & Canepa, Alessandra & Stoneman, Paul, 2009. "e-Business usage across and within firms in the UK: profitability, externalities and policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 133-143, February.
  7. Giuliana Battisti & Heinz Hollenstein & Paul Stoneman & Martin Woerter, 2005. "Inter and Intra firm Diffusion of ICT in the United Kingdom (UK) and Switzerland (CH) : An Internationally Comparative Study Based on Firm-level Data," KOF Working papers 05-111, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  8. Jordi Pons-Novell & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, . "Cities and the internet: The end of distance?," Studies on the Spanish Economy 198, FEDEA.

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