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Airline Schedule Recovery after Airport Closures: Empirical Evidence Since September 11th

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  • Nicholas G. Rupp
  • George M. Holmes
  • Jeff DeSimone

Abstract

Since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, repeated airport closures due to potential security breaches have imposed substantial costs on travelers, airlines, and government agencies in terms of flight delays and cancellations. Using data from the year following September 11th, this study examines how airlines recover flight schedules upon reopening of airports that have been closed for security reasons. As such, this is the first study to examine service quality during irregular operations. Our results indicate that while outcomes of flights scheduled during airport closures are difficult to explain, a variety of factors, including potential revenue per flight and logistical variables such as flight distance, seating capacity and shutdown severity, significantly predict outcomes of flights scheduled after airports reopen. Given the likelihood of continued security-related airport closings, understanding the factors that determine schedule recovery is potentially important.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9744.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Publication status: published as Rupp, Nicholas G., George M. Holmes and Jeff DeSimone. "Airline Schedule Recovery After Airport Closures: Empirical Evidence Since September 11," Southern Economic Journal, 2005, v71(4,Apr), 800-820.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9744

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  1. Christopher Mayer & Todd Sinai, . "Network Effects, Congestion Externalities, and Air Traffic Delays: Or Why All Delays Are Not Evil," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 393, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
  2. Stephen Foreman, 1999. "Publication of Information and Market Response: The Case of Airline on Time Performance Reports," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 147-162, March.
  3. Nicholas G. Rupp & Douglas H. Owens & L. Wayne Plumly, . "Does Competition Influence Airline On-Time Performance?," Working Papers 0301, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  4. Jan K. Brueckner, 2002. "Airport Congestion When Carriers Have Market Power," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1357-1375, December.
  5. Nick Rupp & Mark Holmes, . "Why Are So Many Flights Canceled?," Working Papers 0204, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  6. Borenstein, Severin & Netz, Janet, 1999. "Why do all the flights leave at 8 am?: Competition and departure-time differentiation in airline markets," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 611-640, July.
  7. Kim, E Han & Singal, Vijay, 1993. "Mergers and Market Power: Evidence from the Airline Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 549-69, June.
  8. Thengvall, Benjamin G. & Yu, Gang & Bard, Jonathan F., 2001. "Multiple fleet aircraft schedule recovery following hub closures," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 289-308, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Carl Bonham & Christopher Edmonds & James Mak, 2006. "The Impact of 9/11 and Other Terrible Global Events on Tourism in the U.S. and Hawaii," Economics Study Area Working Papers 87, East-West Center, Economics Study Area.
  2. Claudio Agostini, 2005. "El Mercado de Transporte Aéreo: Lecciones para Chile de una Revisión de la Literatura," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv163, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
  3. Harumi Ito & Darin Lee, 2003. "Assessing the Impact of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Airline Demand," Working Papers 2003-16, Brown University, Department of Economics.

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