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On the Measurement of the International Propagation of Shocks

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  • Roberto Rigobon

Abstract

In this paper I offer an alternative identification assumption that allows one to test for changing patterns regarding the international propagation of shocks when endogenous variables, omitted variables, and heteroskedasticity are present in the data. Using this methodology, I demonstrate that the propagation mechanisms of 36 stock markets remained relatively stable throughout the last three major international crises which have been associated with 'contagion' (i.e., Mexico 1994, Hong Kong 1997, and Russia 1998). These findings cast considerable doubt upon theories that suggest that the propagation of shocks is crisis contingent, and driven by endogenous liquidity issues, multiple equilibria, and political contagion. Rather, these findings would seem to support theories that identify such matters as trade, learning, and aggregate shocks as the primary transmission mechanisms in this process.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7354.

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Date of creation: Sep 1999
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Publication status: published as Rigobon, Roberto, 2003. "On the measurement of the international propagation of shocks: is the transmission stable?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 261-283, December.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7354

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  1. Calvo, Sara & Reinhart, Carmen, 1996. "Capital flows to Latin America : Is there evidence of contagion effects?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1619, The World Bank.
  2. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kenneth A. Froot & Paul G.J. O'Connell & Mark S. Seasholes, 1998. "The Portfolio Flows of International Investors, I," NBER Working Papers 6687, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Reuven Glick & Andrew K. Rose, 1998. "Contagion and Trade: Why Are Currency Crises Regional?," NBER Working Papers 6806, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Gerlach, Stefan & Smets, Frank, 1995. "Contagious speculative attacks," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 45-63, March.
  6. Calvo, Guillermo A. & Mendoza, Enrique G., 2000. "Rational contagion and the globalization of securities markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 79-113, June.
  7. King, Mervyn A & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1990. "Transmission of Volatility between Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 5-33.
  8. Robert S. Pindyck & Julio J. Rotemberg, 1988. "The Excess Co-Movement of Commodity Prices," NBER Working Papers 2671, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Kaminsky, Graciela L. & Reinhart, Carmen M., 2000. "On crises, contagion, and confusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 145-168, June.
  10. Hamao, Yasushi & Masulis, Ronald W & Ng, Victor, 1990. "Correlations in Price Changes and Volatility across International Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(2), pages 281-307.
  11. Giancarol Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti & Nouriel Roubini & Cedric Tille, 1999. "Competitive devaluations: a welfare-based approach," Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 58, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  12. Kristin Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 1999. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Co-movements," NBER Working Papers 7267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Pindyck, Robert S & Rotemberg, Julio J, 1993. "The Comovement of Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 108(4), pages 1073-1104, November.
  14. Eichengreen, Barry & Rose, Andrew K & Wyplosz, Charles, 1996. "Contagious Currency Crises," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 1453, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Paul Cashin & Manmohan S. Kumar & C. John McDermott, 1995. "International Integration of Equity Markets and Contagion Effects," IMF Working Papers 95/110, International Monetary Fund.
  16. Ray Yeu-Tien Chou & Victor Ng & Lynn K. Pi, 1994. "Cointegration of International Stock Market Indices," IMF Working Papers 94/94, International Monetary Fund.
  17. Sebastian Edwards, 1998. "Interest Rate Volatility, Capital Controls, and Contagion," NBER Working Papers 6756, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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