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Worker Adaptation and Employer Accommodation Following the Onset of a Health Impairment

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  • Mary C. Daly
  • John Bound

Abstract

The responses of workers and their employers to the onset of work-limiting health impairments were investigated using data from the new Health and Retirement Survey. The results indicate that many workers who suffer from health limitations are directly accommodated by their employers, and that those who do not receive direct accommodation frequently adapt to their limitations by altering their job demands or by changing jobs. These findings point to the potential for adjustments on both sides of the market: by employers-- in the form of job accommodation--and by employees--in the form of job change.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 5169.

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Date of creation: Jul 1995
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Publication status: published as "The Adaptation of Workers to the Onset of Health Limitations," Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences: Volume 51B, Issue 2 Pp. S53-S60. March 1996
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5169

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  1. Haveman, Robert H. & Wolfe, Barbara L., 1984. "Disability transfers and early retirement: a casual relationship?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 47-66, June.
  2. Bound, John & Waidmann, Timothy, 1992. "Disability Transfers, Self-Reported Health, and the Labor Force Attachment of Older Men: Evidence from the Historical Record," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1393-419, November.
  3. Parsons, Donald O, 1980. "The Decline in Male Labor Force Participation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 117-34, February.
  4. Gloria J. Bazzoli, 1985. "The Early Retirement Decision: New Empirical Evidence on the Influence of Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(2), pages 214-234.
  5. Marjorie Baldwin & William G. Johnson, 1994. "Labor Market Discrimination against Men with Disabilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(1), pages 1-19.
  6. John Bound, 1989. "The Health and Earnings of Rejected Disability Insurance Applicants," NBER Working Papers 2816, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Steven Stern, 1989. "Measuring the Effect of Disability on Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 361-395.
  8. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
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Cited by:
  1. Steven Haider & David Loughran, 2001. "Elderly Labor Supply: Work or Play?," Working Papers 01-09, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  2. Alan Krueger & Douglas Kruse, 1995. "Labor Market Effects of Spinal Cord Injuries in the Dawn of the Computer Age," Working Papers 728, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Melissa Bjelland, 2005. "Are the Lasting Effects of Employee-Employer Separations induced by Layoff and Disability Similar? Exploring Job Displacement using Survey and Administrative Data," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2005-03, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  4. John Bound & Todd Stinebrickner & Timothy Waidman, 2004. "Using a Structural Retirement Model to Simulate the Effect of Changes to the OASDI and Medicare Programs," Working Papers wp091, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  5. repec:fth:prinin:349 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Regina T. Riphahn, 1999. "Income and employment effects of health shocks A test case for the German welfare state," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 363-389.
  7. Steven J. Haider & David S. Loughran, 2003. "How Important Are Wages to the Elderly? Evidence from the New Beneficiary Data System and the Social Security Earnings Test," Working Papers wp049, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  8. Richard V. Burkhauser & Lauren H. Nicholas & Maximilian D. Schmeiser, 2011. "The Importance of State Anti-Discrimination Laws on Employer Accommodation and the Movement of their Employees onto Social Security Disability Insurance," Working Papers wp251, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

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