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The Effects of School and Family Characteristics on the Return to Education

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  • Joseph G. Altonji
  • Thomas A. Dunn

Abstract

We measure the effects of parental education on the education profile of wages. The analysis uses sibling pairs from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Young Men and Young Women. We also use the variance across siblings in school characteristics to estimate the effects of school inputs on wages holding family background constant. We obtained mixed evidence on whether parental education raises the return to education. We find that teacher's salary, expenditures per pupil, and a composite index of school quality measures have a substantial positive effect on the wages of high school graduates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 5072.

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Date of creation: Mar 1995
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Publication status: Published as "The Demand For and Return to Education When Education Outcomes are Uncertain", Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 11, no. 1 (1993): 48-83.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5072

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  1. Orley Ashenfelter & Alan Krueger, 1992. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 683, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. Garen, John, 1984. "The Returns to Schooling: A Selectivity Bias Approach with a Continuous Choice Variable," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 52(5), pages 1199-1218, September.
  3. Orley Ashenfelter & David J. Zimmerman, 1997. "Estimates Of The Returns To Schooling From Sibling Data: Fathers, Sons, And Brothers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 1-9, February.
  4. Griliches, Zvi, 1977. "Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Some Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 1-22, January.
  5. David Card, 1994. "Earnings, Schooling, and Ability Revisited," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 710, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  6. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
  7. repec:fth:prinin:331 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Joseph G. Altonji, 1991. "The Demand for and Return to Education When Education Outcomes are Uncertain," NBER Working Papers 3714, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Lang, Kevin, 1993. "Ability Bias, Discount Rate Bias and the Return to Education," MPRA Paper 24651, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S37-64, October.
  11. repec:fth:prinin:334 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. repec:fth:prinin:318 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. David Card & Alan Krueger, 1994. "The Economic Return to School Quality: A Partial Survey," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 713, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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Cited by:
  1. Will Dobbie & Roland G. Fryer, Jr, 2011. "Getting Beneath the Veil of Effective Schools: Evidence from New York City," NBER Working Papers 17632, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Rowena A. Pecchenino & Patricia S. Pollard, 2000. "Dependent children and aged parents: funding education and social security in an aging economy," Working Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis 1995-001, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  3. Lykke Andersen, 2001. "Social Mobility in Latin America: Links with Adolescent Schooling," Research Department Publications, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 3130, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  4. Eide, Eric R. & Ronan, Nick, 2001. "Is participation in high school athletics an investment or a consumption good?: Evidence from high school and beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 431-442, October.
  5. Mihaela Pintea & Peter Thompson, 2005. "Technological Complexity and Economic Growth," Working Papers, Florida International University, Department of Economics 0502, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  6. Iacovou, Maria, 2001. "Class size in the early years: is smaller really better?," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  7. J. R. Betts, . "The impact of school resources on women's earnings and educational attainment: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty 1108-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  8. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Do Peer Groups Matter? Peer Group versus Schooling Effects on Academic Attainment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(277), pages 31-53, February.
  9. Brunello, Giorgio & Comi, Simona, 2004. "Education and earnings growth: evidence from 11 European countries," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 75-83, February.
  10. Kermit Daniel & Dan Black & Jeffery Smith, 1996. "College Quality and the Wages of Young Men," HEW, EconWPA 9604001, EconWPA.
  11. Mathias Huebener, 2012. "The Role of Family Risk Attitudes in Education and Intergenerational Mobility: An Empirical Analysis," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 529, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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