Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Macroeconomic Convergence: International Transmission of Growth and Technical Progress

Contents:

Author Info

  • John F. Helliwell
  • Alan Chung

Abstract

This paper uses data for nineteen industrial countries over the period 1960-1985 to examine the evidence for international convergence of technical progress. Several models of convergence, including a model in which convergence is affected by changes in a country's openness to trade, are evaluated against competing alternatives. We also assess the extent to which convergence depends on some key measurement issues, including the use of purchasing power parities to compare real output in different countries, the use of different capital stocks in aggregate production functions, and alternative ways of representing embodied or disembodied technical progress. The various models of technical progress are assessed by non-nested tests of both the estimated output equations, using the factor utilization model, and their related factor demand equations. The results show significant evidence of international convergence in the rates of growth of labour efficiency, and some evidence that convergence is faster for countries that have been increasing their openness to international trade. A more general model of output determination, encompassing variations in factor utilization as well as tho autocorrelated technology shocks used in real business cycle models, was found to be preferred over more restricted alternatives.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w3264.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 3264.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Apr 1992
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as International Economic Transactions: Issues in Measurement and Empirical Research, edited by Peter Hooper and J. David Richardson, pp. 388-436. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3264

Note: PR
Contact details of provider:
Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Email:
Web page: http://www.nber.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Samuel S. Kortum & Jonathan Eaton, 1995. "Engines of growth: domestic and foreign sources of innovation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-35, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Harrison, Ann, 1996. "Openness and growth: A time-series, cross-country analysis for developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 419-447, March.
  3. John F. Helliwell, 1994. "Empirical Linkages Between Democracy and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 4066, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Deb Kusum Das, 2007. "Trade Liberalization and Industrial Productivity: An Assessment of Developing Country Experiences," Working Papers id:1009, eSocialSciences.
  5. Wolff, Edward N., 1995. "Technological change, capital accumulation, and changing trade patterns over the long term," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 43-70, March.
  6. John F. Helliwell, 1994. "International Growth Linkages: Evidence from Asia and the OECD," NBER Working Papers 4245, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Peter Howitt, 2000. "Endogenous Growth and Cross-Country Income Differences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 829-846, September.
  8. John F. Helliwell & Alan Chung, 1992. "Convergence and Growth Linkages Between North and South," NBER Working Papers 3948, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. John F. Helliwell, 1992. "Trade and Technical Progress," NBER Working Papers 4226, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Aghion, Philippe, 2002. "Les défis d’une nouvelle théorie de la croissance," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 78(4), pages 459-486, Décembre.
  11. Jaanus Raim, 2004. "The Alternative to the Existing System of the Concepts about Purchasing Power Parity Deviations . Derived from the Estonian Experience," Working Papers 115, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3264. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.