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Copycatting: Fiscal Policies of States and Their Neighbors

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  • Anne C. Case
  • James R. Hines, Jr.
  • Harvey S. Rosen

Abstract

This paper formalizes and tests the notion that state governments' expenditures depend on the spending of similarly situated states. We find that even after allowing for fixed state effects, year effects, and common random effects between neighbors, as state government's level of per capita expenditure is positively and significantly affected by the expenditure levels of its neighbors. Ceteris paribus, a one dollar increase in a state's neighbors' expenditures increases its own expenditure by over 70 cents.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 3032.

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Date of creation: Jul 1989
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Publication status: published as "Budget Spillover and Fiscal Policy Interdependence: Evidence from the States", Journal of Public Economics, vol. 52, October 1993, p. 285-307
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3032

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  1. Edward M. Gramlich & Deborah S. Laren, 1984. "Migration and Income Redistribution Responsibilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(4), pages 489-511.
  2. Steven G. Craig & Robert P. Inman, 1985. "Education, Welfare, and the "New" Federalism: State Budgeting in a Federalist Public Economy," NBER Working Papers 1562, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Johnson, William R, 1988. "Income Redistribution in a Federal System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 570-73, June.
  4. Gramlich, Edward M & Rubinfeld, Daniel L, 1982. "Micro Estimates of Public Spending Demand Functions and Tests of the Tiebout and Median-Voter Hypotheses," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(3), pages 536-60, June.
  5. J. Richard Aronson & James R. Marsden, 1980. "Duplicating Moody's Municipal Credit Ratings," Public Finance Review, , vol. 8(1), pages 97-106, January.
  6. Dennis Mueller & Peter Murrell, 1986. "Interest groups and the size of government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 125-145, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Phillip B. Levine & David J. Zimmerman, 1999. "An empirical analysis of the welfare magnet debate using the NLSY," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 391-409.
  2. Geys, Benny, 2006. "Looking across borders: A test of spatial policy interdependence using local government efficiency ratings," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 443-462, November.
  3. Eberts, Randall W. & Gronberg, Timothy J., 1990. "Structure, Conduct, and Performance in the Local Public Sector," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 43(2), pages 165-73, June.
  4. Cutler, David M & Elmendorf, Douglas W & Zeckhauser, Richard J, 1993. "Demographic Characteristics and the Public Bundle," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 48(Supplemen), pages 178-98.
  5. Cull, Robert, 1998. "How deposit insurance affects financial depth : a cross-country analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1875, The World Bank.
  6. David Bell & Sangyoung Song, 2007. "Neighborhood effects and trial on the internet: Evidence from online grocery retailing," Quantitative Marketing and Economics, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 361-400, December.
  7. Reuven Glick & Michael Hutchison, 1992. "Fiscal policy in monetary unions: implications for Europe," Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory 92-02, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  8. Heyndels, Bruno & Vuchelen, Jef, 1998. "Tax Mimicking Among Belgian Municipalities," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 51(n. 1), pages 89-101, March.

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