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International Competitiveness and Monetary Policy: Strategic Policy and Coordination with a Production Relocation Externality

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  • Paul R. Bergin
  • Giancarlo Corsetti

Abstract

Can a country gain international competitiveness by the design of optimal monetary stabilization rules? This paper reconsiders this question by specifying an open-economy monetary model encompassing a ‘production relocation externality,’ developed in trade theory to analyze the benefits from promoting entry of domestic firms in the manufacturing sector. In a macroeconomic context, this externality provides an incentive for monetary authorities to trade-off output gap with pro-competitive profit stabilization. While helping manufacturing firms to set competitively low prices, optimal pro-competitive stabilization nonetheless results in stronger terms of trade, due to the change in the country’s specialization and composition of exports. The welfare gains from international policy coordination are large relative to the case of self-oriented, strategic conduct of stabilization policy. Empirical evidence confirms that the effects of monetary policy design on the composition of trade predicted by the theory are present in data and are quantitatively important.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19356.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19356

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  1. Sutherland, Alan, 2002. "International monetary policy coordination and financial market integration," Working Paper Series, European Central Bank 0174, European Central Bank.
  2. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2000. "New directions for stochastic open economy models," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 117-153, February.
  3. Cavallari, Lilia, 2010. "Exports and foreign direct investments in an endogenous-entry model with real and nominal uncertainty," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 300-313, March.
  4. Matthew B. Canzoneri & Robert E. Cumby & Behzad T. Diba, 2002. "The Need for International Policy Coordination: What's Old, What's New, What's Yet to Come?," NBER Working Papers 8765, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Ghironi, Fabio & Melitz, Marc, 2005. "International Trade and Macroeconomic Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms," Scholarly Articles 3228377, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Michael B. Devereux & Charles Engel, 2003. "Monetary Policy in the Open Economy Revisited: Price Setting and Exchange-Rate Flexibility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(4), pages 765-783.
  7. Jay C. Shambaugh, 2004. "The Effect of Fixed Exchange Rates on Monetary Policy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 300-351, February.
  8. Campolmi, Alessia & Fadinger, Harald & Forlati, Chiara, 2014. "Trade policy: Home market effect versus terms-of-trade externality," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 92-107.
  9. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Haiyan Deng & Alyson C. Ma & Hengyong Mo, 2005. "World Trade Flows: 1962-2000," NBER Working Papers 11040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Martin, Philippe & Pesenti, Paolo, 2007. "Productivity, terms of trade and the `home market effect'," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 99-127, September.
  11. Krugman, Paul, 1980. "Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 950-59, December.
  12. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
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