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Thirty Years of Prospect Theory in Economics: A Review and Assessment

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  • Nicholas C. Barberis
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    Abstract

    Prospect theory, first described in a 1979 paper by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, is widely viewed as the best available description of how people evaluate risk in experimental settings. While the theory contains many remarkable insights, economists have found it challenging to apply these insights, and it is only recently that there has been real progress in doing so. In this paper, after first reviewing prospect theory and the difficulties inherent in applying it, I discuss some of this recent work. While it is too early to declare this research effort an unqualified success, the rapid progress of the last decade makes me optimistic that at least some of the insights of prospect theory will eventually find a permanent and significant place in mainstream economic analysis.

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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18621.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18621

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    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Shleifer, Andrei, 2012. "Psychologists at the Gate: Review of Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow," Scholarly Articles 10735580, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    2. McIntyre Stuart G, 2013. "Personal indebtedness, community characteristics and theft crimes," Working Papers 1320, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.

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