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Parental Investments in College and Later Cash Transfers

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  • Steven J. Haider
  • Kathleen M. McGarry

Abstract

The rising cost of college tuition and the accompanying investment parents often make have received considerable attention recently. While classic models in economics make important predictions about the magnitudes of these investments, their distribution across children, and their relationship with later cash transfers, there has been little empirical work examining these predictions, especially with regards to the differential treatment of siblings. Using unique data from a supplement to the Health and Retirement Study, we find that parents typically invest differentially in the schooling of siblings, but we find no evidence that these investments are offset by later cash transfers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18485.

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Date of creation: Oct 2012
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18485

Note: AG CH ED LS PE
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  1. Jasmin Kantarevic & St├ęphane Mechoulan, 2006. "Birth Order, Educational Attainment, and Earnings: An Investigation Using the PSID," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
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  7. William Parish & Robert J. Willis, . "Daughters, Education and Family Budgets: Taiwan Experiences," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 92-8a, Chicago - Population Research Center.
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  11. Christopher Dougherty, 2005. "Why Are the Returns to Schooling Higher for Women than for Men?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(4), pages 969-988.
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Cited by:
  1. Lance Lochner & Todd Stinebrickner & Utku Suleymanoglu, 2013. "The Importance of Financial Resources for Student Loan Repayment," CESifo Working Paper Series 4515, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. repec:hka:wpaper:2013-20 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Chih-Chin Ho & Ching-Yang Lin & Cheng-Tao Tang, 2013. "How Do Income and Bequest Taxes Affect Income Inequality? The Role of Parental Transfers," Working Papers EMS_2013_10, Research Institute, International University of Japan.

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