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The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation

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  • Claudia Goldin
  • Lawrence F. Katz

Abstract

Pharmacy has become a female-majority profession that is highly remunerated with a small gender earnings gap and low earnings dispersion relative to other occupations. We sketch a labor market framework based on the theory of equalizing differences to integrate and interpret our empirical findings on earnings, hours of work, and the part-time work wage penalty for pharmacists. Using extensive surveys of pharmacists for 2000, 2004, and 2009 as well as samples from the American Community Surveys and the Current Population Surveys, we explore the gender earnings gap, the penalty to part-time work, labor force persistence, and the demographics of pharmacists relative to other college graduates. We address why the substantial entrance of women into the profession was associated with an increase in their earnings relative to male pharmacists. We conclude that the changing nature of pharmacy employment with the growth of large national pharmacy chains and hospitals and the related decline of independent pharmacies played key roles in the creation of a more family-friendly, female-friendly pharmacy profession. The position of pharmacist is probably the most egalitarian of all U.S. professions today.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18410.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18410

Note: DAE LS
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Cited by:
  1. Asphjell, Magne K. & Hensvik, Lena & Nilsson, J. Peter, 2013. "Businesses, Buddies, and Babies: Fertility and Social Interactions at Work," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies, Uppsala University, Department of Economics 2013:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  2. Stevenson, Adam, 2012. "The Male-Female Gap in Post-Baccalaureate School Quality," MPRA Paper 36533, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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