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Vaccine Supply: Effects Of Regulation And Competition

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  • Patricia M. Danzon
  • Nuno S. Pereira

Abstract

In US vaccine markets, competing producers with high fixed, sunk costs face relatively concentrated demand. The resulting price and quality competition leads to the exit of all but one or very few producers per vaccine. Our empirical analysis of exits from US vaccine markets supports the hypothesis that high fixed costs and both price and quality competition contribute to vaccine exits. We find no evidence that government purchasing has significant effects, possibly because government purchase tends to increase volume but lower price, with offsetting effects. Evidence from the flu vaccine market confirms that government purchasing is not a necessary condition for exits and the existence of few suppliers per vaccine in the US.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17205.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Publication status: published as Patricia Danzon & Nuno Sousa Pereira, 2011. "Vaccine Supply: Effects of Regulation and Competition," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 239-271.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17205

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  1. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-83, June.
  2. Christopher Ruebeck, 2004. "Model Exit in a Vertically Differentiated Market: Interfirm Competition versus Intrafirm Cannibalization in the Computer Hard Disk Drive Industry," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 27-59, November.
  3. Timothy Dunne & Mark J. Roberts & Larry Samuelson, 1988. "Patterns of Firm Entry and Exit in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 19(4), pages 495-515, Winter.
  4. Ghemawat, Pankaj & Nalebuff, Barry, 1990. "The Devolution of Declining Industries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 105(1), pages 167-86, February.
  5. Richard Disney & Jonathan Haskel & Ylva Heden, 2003. "Entry, Exit and Establishment Survival in UK Manufacturing," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 91-112, 03.
  6. Richard E. Caves, 1998. "Industrial Organization and New Findings on the Turnover and Mobility of Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 1947-1982, December.
  7. Manning, Richard L, 1994. "Changing Rules in Tort Law and the Market for Childhood Vaccines," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(1), pages 247-75, April.
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