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Do Differences in Schools’ Instruction Time Explain International Achievement Gaps? Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries

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  • Victor Lavy

Abstract

The time that children spend in school varies across countries. Do these differences explain international gaps in pupils’ academic achievements? In this paper, I estimate the effects of instructional time on students’ achievement using PISA 2006 data, which includes data samples from over 50 countries. I find that instructional time has a positive and significant effect on test scores, and that the effect is much lower in developing countries. Evidence also suggests that the productivity of instructional time is higher in countries which implemented school accountability measures or that gave schools autonomy in budgetary decisions and in hiring/firing teachers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16227.

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Date of creation: Jul 2010
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16227

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  1. Kane, Thomas J. & Rockoff, Jonah E. & Staiger, Douglas O., 2008. "What does certification tell us about teacher effectiveness? Evidence from New York City," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 615-631, December.
  2. Eric A. Hanushek, 2002. "The Failure of Input-based Schooling Policies," NBER Working Papers 9040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 1998. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," NBER Working Papers 6691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Philipp Mandel & Bernd Süssmuth, 2011. "Total Instructional Time Exposure and Student Achievement: An Extreme Bounds Analysis Based on German State-Level Variation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3580, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Joshua Goodman, 2014. "Flaking Out: Student Absences and Snow Days as Disruptions of Instructional Time," NBER Working Papers 20221, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Juan Manuel Guío & Álvaro Choi, 2013. "Evolution of the school failure risk during the 2000 decade in Spain: analysis of Pisa results with a two-level logistic model," Working Papers 2013/17, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  4. Meyer, Erik & Van Klaveren, Chris, 2013. "The effectiveness of extended day programs: Evidence from a randomized field experiment in the Netherlands," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-11.
  5. Torberg Falch & Marte Rønning, 2012. "Homework assignment and student achievement in OECD countries," Discussion Papers 711, Research Department of Statistics Norway.

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