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Estimating Treatment Effects from Contaminated Multi-Period Education Experiments: The Dynamic Impacts of Class Size Reductions

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  • Weili Ding
  • Steven F. Lehrer

Abstract

This paper introduces an empirical strategy to estimate dynamic treatment effects in randomized trials that provide treatment in multiple stages and in which various noncompliance problems arise such as attrition and selective transitions between treatment and control groups. Our approach is applied to the highly influential four year randomized class size study, Project STAR. We find benefits from attending small class in all cognitive subject areas in kindergarten and the first grade. We do not find any statistically significant dynamic benefits from continuous treatment versus never attending small classes following grade one. Finally, statistical tests support accounting for both selective attrition and noncompliance with treatment assignment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15200.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Publication status: published as Weili Ding & Steven F Lehrer, 2010. "Estimating Treatment Effects from Contaminated Multiperiod Education Experiments: The Dynamic Impacts of Class Size Reductions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 31-42, 06.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15200

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  8. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of income Dynamics," Economics Working Paper Archive 379, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
  9. James Heckman & Neil Hohmann & Jeffrey Smith & Michael Khoo, 2000. "Substitution And Dropout Bias In Social Experiments: A Study Of An Influential Social Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(2), pages 651-694, May.
  10. Horowitz, Joel L & Manski, Charles F, 1995. "Identification and Robustness with Contaminated and Corrupted Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 63(2), pages 281-302, March.
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  12. Steven Lehrer & Weili Ding, 2004. "Estimating Dynamic Treatment Effects from Project STAR," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 252, Econometric Society.
  13. Yoram Ben-Porath, 1967. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 352.
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  15. Ruth Miquel, 2002. "Identification of Dynamic Treatment Effects by Instrumental Variables," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2002 2002-11, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
  16. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects Of Class Size On Student Achievement: New Evidence From Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285, November.
  17. Yau L.H.Y. & Little R.J., 2001. "Inference for the Complier-Average Causal Effect From Longitudinal Data Subject to Noncompliance and Missing Data, With Application to a Job Training Assessment for the Unemployed," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 1232-1244, December.
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  19. Sean Becketti & William Gould & Lee Lillard & Finis Welch, 1985. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics After Fourteen Years: An Evaluation," UCLA Economics Working Papers 361, UCLA Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Frölich, Markus & Huber, Martin, 2014. "Treatment evaluation with multiple outcome periods under endogeneity and attrition," Economics Working Paper Series 1404, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  2. Adnan Q. Khan & Steven F. Lehrer, 2013. "The Impact of Social Networks on Labour Market Outcomes: New Evidence from Cape Breton," NBER Working Papers 18786, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Weili Ding & Steven F. Lehrer, 2014. "Understanding the Role of Time-Varying Unobserved Ability Heterogeneity in Education Production," NBER Working Papers 19937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Shu Wen Ng & Edward C. Norton & David K. Guilkey & Barry M. Popkin, 2010. "Estimation of a Dynamic Model of Weight," NBER Working Papers 15864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Weili Ding & Steven Lehrer, 2011. "Experimental estimates of the impacts of class size on test scores: robustness and heterogeneity," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 229-252.
  6. Frölich, Markus & Huber, Martin, 2014. "Treatment Evaluation with Multiple Outcome Periods under Endogeneity and Attrition," IZA Discussion Papers 7972, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Michael Baker, 2011. "Industrial Actions in Schools: Strikes and Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 16846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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