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Social Interactions and Smoking

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  • David M. Cutler
  • Edward L. Glaeser

Abstract

Are individuals more likely to smoke when they are surrounded by smokers? In this paper, we examine the evidence for peer effects in smoking. We address the endogeneity of peers by looking at the impact of workplace smoking bans on spousal and peer group smoking. Using these bans as an instrument, we find that individuals whose spouses smoke are 40 percent more likely to smoke themselves. We also find evidence for the existence of a social multiplier in that the impact of smoking bans and individual income becomes stronger at higher levels of aggregation. This social multiplier could explain the large time series drop in smoking among some demographic groups.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13477.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Publication status: published as Social Interactions and Smoking , David M. Cutler, Edward L. Glaeser. in Research Findings in the Economics of Aging , Wise. 2010
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13477

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  1. Zwiebel, Jeffrey H. & Vayanos, Dimitri & DeMarzo, Peter M., 2001. "Persuasion Bias, Social Influence, and Uni-Dimensional Opinions," Research Papers 1719, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  2. Lisa M. George & Joel Waldfogel, 2006. "The New York Times and the Market for Local Newspapers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 435-447, March.
  3. Allison, G. & Fudenberg, D., 1992. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," Working papers 92-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  4. William N. Evans & Matthew C. Farrelly & Edward Montgomery, 1996. "Do Workplace Smoking Bans Reduce Smoking?," NBER Working Papers 5567, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Anne C. Case & Lawrence F. Katz, 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects of Family and Neighborhood on Disadvantaged Youths," NBER Working Papers 3705, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lisa George & Joel Waldfogel, 2003. "Who Affects Whom in Daily Newspaper Markets?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(4), pages 765-784, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Onur Ozgur & Alberto Bisin, 2011. "Dynamic linear economies with social interactions," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000036, David K. Levine.
  2. ÖZGÜR, Onur & BISIN, Alberto, 2011. "Dynamic Linear Economies with Social Interactions," Cahiers de recherche 04-2011, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
  3. Panu Poutvaara & Lars-H.R. Siemers, 2007. "Smoking and Social Interaction," Ruhr Economic Papers 0003, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  4. Padmaja Ayyagari & Jody L. Sindelar, 2009. "The Impact of Job Stress on Smoking and Quitting: Evidence from the HRS," NBER Working Papers 15232, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Behncke, Stefanie & Frölich, Markus & Lechner, Michael, 2008. "A Caseworker Like Me - Does the Similarity between unemployed and Caseworker Increase Job Placements?," CEPR Discussion Papers 6784, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Marianne P. Bitler & Christopher Carpenter & Madeline Zavodny, 2009. "Effects of Venue-Specific State Clean Indoor Air Laws on Smoking-Related Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 15229, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. McVicar, Duncan, 2011. "Estimates of peer effects in adolescent smoking across twenty six European Countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1186-1193.
  8. Paolo Buonanno & Paolo Vanin, 2007. "Bowling Alone, Drinking Together," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0055, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  9. Eisenberg, Daniel & Golberstein, Ezra & Whitlock, Janis L., 2014. "Peer effects on risky behaviors: New evidence from college roommate assignments," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 126-138.
  10. Tenn, Steven & Herman, Douglas A. & Wendling, Brett, 2010. "The role of education in the production of health: An empirical analysis of smoking behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 404-417, May.
  11. David Aristei & Luca Pieroni, 2009. "Addiction, social interactions and gender differences in cigarette consumption," Empirica, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 245-272, August.
  12. Elisabetta Lazzaro & Carlofilippo Frateschi, 2008. "Attendance to cultural events and spousal influences: the Italian case," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0084, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".

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