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Do Analysts Herd? An Analysis of Recommendations and Market Reactions

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  • Narasimhan Jegadeesh
  • Woojin Kim

Abstract

This paper develops and implements a new test to investigate whether sell-side analysts herd around the consensus when they make stock recommendations. Our empirical results support the herding hypothesis. Stock price reactions following recommendation revisions are stronger when the new recommendation is away from the consensus than when it is closer to it, indicating that the market recognizes analysts' tendency to herd. We find that analysts from larger brokerages and analysts following stocks with smaller dispersion across recommendations are more likely to herd.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12866.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12866.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
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Publication status: published as Narasimhan Jegadeesh & Woojin Kim, 2010. "Do Analysts Herd? An Analysis of Recommendations and Market Reactions," Review of Financial Studies, Oxford University Press for Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(2), pages 901-937, February.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12866

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  1. Ivkovic, Zoran & Jegadeesh, Narasimhan, 2004. "The timing and value of forecast and recommendation revisions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 433-463, September.
  2. Sorescu, Sorin & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2004. "The Cross-Section of Analyst Recommendations," University of California at Los Angeles, Anderson Graduate School of Management qt76x8k0cc, Anderson Graduate School of Management, UCLA.
  3. Jaffe, Jeffrey F. & Mahoney, James M., 1999. "The performance of investment newsletters," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 289-307, August.
  4. Scharfstein, David. & Stein, Jeremy C., 1988. "Herd behavior and investment," Working papers WP 2062-88., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  5. Sushil Bikhchandani & Sunil Sharma, 2001. "Herd Behavior in Financial Markets," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(3), pages 1.
  6. Narasimhan Jegadeesh & Joonghyuk Kim & Susan D. Krische & Charles M. C. Lee, 2004. "Analyzing the Analysts: When Do Recommendations Add Value?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1083-1124, 06.
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Cited by:
  1. Kapetanios, George & Mitchell, James & Shin, Yongcheol, 2014. "A nonlinear panel data model of cross-sectional dependence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 179(2), pages 134-157.
  2. Bizer, Kilian & Meub, Lukas & Proeger, Till & Spiwoks, Markus, 2014. "Strategic coordination in forecasting: An experimental study," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 195, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  3. Bert de Bruijn & Philip Hans Franses, 2012. "What drives the Quotes of Earnings Forecasters?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-067/4, Tinbergen Institute.
  4. Beshears, John & Milkman, Katherine L., 2011. "Do sell-side stock analysts exhibit escalation of commitment?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 304-317, March.
  5. Changki Kim & Yangho Choi & Woojoo Lee & Jae Youn Ahn, 2013. "Analyzing Herd Behavior in Global Stock Markets: An Intercontinental Comparison," Papers 1308.3966, arXiv.org.
  6. Itzhak Venezia & Amrut Nashikkar & Zur Shapira, 2011. "Firm specific and macro herding by professional and amateur investors and their effects on market volatility," Discussion Paper Series dp586, The Center for the Study of Rationality, Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
  7. Bert de Bruijn & Philip Hans Franses, 2013. "Forecasting Earnings Forecasts," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-121/III, Tinbergen Institute.
  8. repec:dgr:uvatin:2012067 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Marcel Naujoks & Kevin Aretz & Alexander Kerl & Andreas Walter, 2009. "Do German security analysts herd?," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 3-29, March.
  10. Jung, Boochun & Shane, Philip B. & Sunny Yang, Yanhua, 2012. "Do financial analysts' long-term growth forecasts matter? Evidence from stock recommendations and career outcomes," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 55-76.

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