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The Diffusion of the Internet and the Geography of the Digital Divide in the United States

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  • Shane Greenstein
  • Jeff Prince

Abstract

This paper analyses the rapid diffusion of the Internet across the United States over the past decade for both households and firms. We put the Internet's diffusion into the context of economic diffusion theory where we consider costs and benefits on the demand and supply side. We also discuss several pictures of the Internet's physical presence using some of the current main techniques for Internet measurement. We highlight different economic perspectives and explanations for the digital divide, that is, unequal availability and use of the Internet.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12182.

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Date of creation: May 2006
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Publication status: published as Mansell, Robin, Danny Quah, and Roger Silverstone (eds.) Oxford Handbook on ICTs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12182

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Cited by:
  1. Elizabeth J. Altman & Frank Nagle & Michael L. Tushman, 2013. "Innovating Without Information Constraints: Organizations, Communities, and Innovation When Information Costs Approach Zero," Harvard Business School Working Papers, Harvard Business School 14-043, Harvard Business School, revised Sep 2014.
  2. Schleife, Katrin, 2010. "What really matters: Regional versus individual determinants of the digital divide in Germany," Research Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 173-185, February.
  3. Vergara, Sebastián & Rovira, Sebastián & Balboni, Mariana, 2011. "ICT in Latin America: A Microdata Analysis," MPRA Paper 34598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Dolata, Ulrich, 2009. "Technological innovations and sectoral change: Transformative capacity, adaptability, patterns of change: An analytical framework," Research Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1066-1076, July.
  5. Susan Athey & Scott Stern, 2013. "The Nature and Incidence of Software Piracy: Evidence from Windows," NBER Working Papers 19755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Peter Stenberg, 2011. "Investment in Rural Broadband Technologies," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1028, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Hitt, Lorin & Tambe, Prasanna, 2007. "Broadband adoption and content consumption," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 362-378, October.
  8. Rajeev Goel & Michael Nelson, 2009. "Determinants of software piracy: economics, institutions, and technology," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(6), pages 637-658, December.
  9. Shane Greenstein, 2006. "Innovation and the Evolution of Market Structure for Internet Access in the United States," Discussion Papers, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research 05-018, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  10. Vergara, Sebastián & Grazzi, Matteo, 2011. "ICT access in Latin America. evidence from household level," MPRA Paper 33266, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Dolata, Ulrich, 2008. "The transformative capacity of new technologies. How innovations affect sectoral change: Conceptual considerations," MPIfG Discussion Paper 08/2, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.

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