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Can IT be Japan's Savior?

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  • Fumio Hayashi
  • Koji Nomura

Abstract

This paper constructs a multi-sector model to take explicit account of the very sharp change in the relative price between non-IT and IT goods. The model is calibrated to the Japanese economy, and its solution path from 1990 on is compared to Japan's macroeconomic performance in the 1990s. Compared to the one-sector analysis of Japan in the 1990s in Hayashi and Prescott (2002), our model does slightly better or just as well in accounting for Japan's output slump and does worse in accounting for the capital-output ratio. We also show that, to revive a 2% long-term growth in percapita GDP, Japan needs to direct 10% of private total hours to the IT sector.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11749.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 11749.

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Date of creation: Nov 2005
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Publication status: published as Hayashi, Fumio and Koji Nomura. "Can IT Be Japan's Savior?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 2005, v19(4,Dec), 543-567.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11749

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References

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  1. Jorgenson, Dale W. & Nomura, Koji, 2005. "The industry origins of Japanese economic growth," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 482-542, December.
  2. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Szalavetz, Andrea, 2007. "Műszaki fejlődés és tőkeintenzitás
    [Technological progress and capital intensity]
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 184-198.
  2. Tatsuyoshi Miyakoshi & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2009. "What decreases the TFP ? The aging labor and ICT imbalance," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-03, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  3. Murat Üngör, 2009. "De-industrialization of the Riches and the Rise of China," DEGIT Conference Papers c014_040, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

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